• Request for proposals: the grants for the “Recovery of Species on the Brink of Extinction” by National Geographic

    The mandate of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) is to “stimulate, promote and support conservation actions for halting biodiversity decline, preventing species’ extinctions, and restoring and conserving intact habitats and ecosystems, both on the ground and in the water”. In partnership with the IUCN SSC, the goal of this request for funding is to halt further biodiversity decline by implementing species conservation plans. We will support on the ground priorities of IUCN SSC Species Conservation Plans (e.g. Action Plans, Conservation Strategies, Population and Habitat Viability Assessments) as well as conservation actions that are endorsed by the relevant IUCN SSC Species Specialist Group. Applications must explicitly address priorities defined in published action plans, which you can find here and here. If no plan for a particular species has been published, the proposal must include a letter of endorsement by the relevant IUCN SSC Species Specialist Group, indicating that the proposal indeed addresses a priority conservation action. Funds are not restricted by taxon or region; proposals must include principal investigators or participants resident in the country where the fieldwork will be conducted and show indication of legal permission to conduct the work if funds are granted. DETAILS Proposals that focus on the following themes are encouraged: Specific and defensible priority actions to avert a species decline; Projects that include the active involvement of early career conservationists; Projects that support conservation leaders from the countries where the species occur Typical proposal requests should be less than $30,000; however, applicants may request up to $50,000. Successful applicants may use awarded funds over one or two years. Up to 20 percent of the total can be used as a stipend for the applicant and/or team members. (Please see the Preparing Your Proposal page regarding stipend eligibility and other budgetary guidance.) All applications should include a clear review of the state of knowledge about the topic and a plan for evaluating the outcomes of the proposed work. Preference will be given to proposals that include feasible plans to demonstrate change in key, quantifiable indicators of: for example, reduction in drivers of population decline (e.g. unsustainable hunting, fishing or logging); or increase in numbers, degree of protection, or connectivity of populations of the target species. For any questions, please write to speciesrecovery@ssc.iucn.org. When applying for this RFP, please select Wildlife in the Lens dropdown menu on the Project Description tab of the application. The deadline for application is 10th July with decisions announced by November. For more information, visit https://www.nationalgeographic.org/grants/grant-opportunities/species-recovery/


    Continue reading
  • NEW:KIT’s endangered bird species T-shirts / Eco-bags

    A Korean design brand NEW:KIT launched a summer 18’ collection inspired by 5 endangered bird species in the East Asian – Australasian Flyway; Red-crowned Crane, Black-faced Spoonbill, Saunders’s Gull, Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Bar-Tailed Godwit. T-Shirts, eco-bags and bracelets inspired by the listed bird species are available in the NEW:KIT’s online store.  EAAFP provided consultation to the company on the information of the listed bird species. More collaboration between EAAFP and NEW:KIT is expected to come.  T-Shirts Eco-bags & Pouch bags RED LIST PROJECT by NEW:KIT The RED LIST PROJECT by NEW:KIT aims to deliver the alarming message of endangered animal species by designing and selling clothing, bags and fashion accessories with witty graphics which come familiar to our daily life. http://new-kit.com


    Continue reading
  • Briefing on the Conservation of Migratory Waterbirds and Wetland in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

    Figure 1 Group photo © Mijin Park/EAAFP On 11 June 2018, the “Briefing on the Conservation of Migratory Waterbirds and Wetlands in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” was held from 10:00h – 12:30h at Board Room, 8 Floor, G – Tower, Songdo, Incheon. The event was co-organized by the East Asian – Australasian Flyway Partnership Secretariat (EAAFP) and the Hanns Seidel Foundation - Korea (HSF), one of EAAFP Partner, which have interacted with DPRK by organizing events and supporting DPRK for raising public awareness on conservation activities for many years. The purpose of the Briefing was to understand the current circumstance in DPRK and discuss how we can cooperate and support them to conserve migratory waterbirds and wetlands in the future.  Around 80 participants attended the Briefing including representatives from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries, Ministry of Unification, UNESCAP-Sub Regional Office, Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem (YSLME), Ramsar Regional Center – East Asia, NGOs, Research Institutes and other interested experts. The Briefing began with an opening from Ms. Hyeseon Do (EAAFP Programme Officer) and this was followed by four 25-minute presentations from four speakers respectively with simultaneous interpretation and Q&A session in the end. Figure 2 Dr.Lew Young   © Mijin Park/EAAFP Mr. Felix Glenk (Project Manager of DPRK, HSF Korea), started the Briefing with capacity building project in DPRK by HSF around Rason Migratory Bird Reserve. He detailed ongoing projects about reforestation and wetland conservation since 2015. He stressed on the importance of joint conservation works with various international organizations with the DPRK. Dr. Lew Young, (Chief Executive, EAAFP), presented the overview of the conservation of migratory waterbirds and wetlands in the DPRK with a focus of Mundok Migratory Bird Reserve [EAAF045]. He also noted that the DPRK has gradually acknowledged the importance wetlands and the need for their sustainable management since proceeding with various cooperative project from 2015. Figure 3 Dr. David Melville © Mijin Park/EAAFP The other speakers also assessed the DPRK is now putting more effort on conserving and ensuring the wise use of nature. Specifically, Dr. Nial Moores (Director, Birds Korea), who has a 30-year experience in the conservation of birds and wetlands in East Asia, pointed out their lack of their capacity even though DPRK has a lot of interest in conserving nature. He emphasized the need for cooperation among Northeast Asia countries to conserve the environment and make a sustainable management platform. Dr. David Melville, an ornithologist from Pukorokoro Miranda Naturalists Trust (New Zealand), also made the point of the value of the remaining tidal flats in DPRK not only for migratory shorebirds but also for people while explaining the shorebird surveys along the West Coast of the DPRK that a New Zealand team has been conducting since 2014.  In the discussions between the participants and speakers, the tidal-flat habitats around the Yellow/West Sea which is bordered by the ROK, DPRK and PR China, were acknowledged as being critically important as a resting and feeding site for millions of waterbirds during their annual migration each year. NGOs and relevant Ministries in the Yellow Sea countries were encouraged to continue, and even increase their efforts in supporting cooperation with the DPRK. DPRK become the 36th Partner of the EAAFP in April 2018. For more pictures: Click on Flickr Press Release in English: Click the attachment For more articles about the event: http://www.yonhapnews.co.kr/bulletin/2018/06/11/0200000000AKR20180611095200065.HTML?input=1195m http://www.segye.com/newsView/20180611007181 http://www.kyeongin.com/main/view.php?key=20180611010003799 http://www.kyeongin.com/main/view.php?key=20180611010003850 http://www.breaknews.com/sub_read.html?uid=582852&section=sc2 http://www.incheonilbo.com/?mod=news&act=articleView&idxno=814406#08hF http://www.ytn.co.kr/_ln/0103_201806111613135310 http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2018/06/11/0200000000AEN20180611009900315.html?did=2106m (For English)


    Continue reading
  • World Migratory Bird Day 2018 – Cambodia

    Primary School Student answered the question about migratory birds. ⓒ DoFWC, MOE/Birdlife/WWT/NatureLife Event Title:World Migratory Bird Day  2018 Cambodia Organizer:Department of Freshwater Wetlands Conservation, Ministry of Environment in collaboration with Department of Environment of Kampot Province and Pannasastra University of Cambodia(PUC) Number of Participants: around 300 people Summary: WMBD was celebrated on 9th and 10th May 2018 by Department of Freshwater Wetland Conservation of General Directorate of Administration for Nature Conservation and Protection, Ministry of Environment together with Environmental Department of Kampot province, and our partners who are working on natural resources and wetlands conservation and management organized awareness and education event "World Migratory Bird Day 2018" at Anlung Pring Protected Landscape where a flock of Sarus Crane and other shorebird such as Black-tailed Godwit using that area as feeding ground during their non-breeding period. University and primary students excited with awareness-raising activities. ⓒ DoFWC, MOE/Birdlife/WWT/NatureLife This awareness event, the World Migratory Bird Day 2018, organized for the purpose of increasing the awareness of natural resource management and conservation of migratory birds, to encourage the public, especially students, to love and protect migratory birds, and to encourage the public to participate in protecting the breeding and non-breeding  grounds of migratory birds. Many awareness-raising materials were designed and produced including books and banners. In addition, T-shirts were also designed and printed for students and related NGOs showing the massage of WMBD 2018 in the theme of "Unifying our Voices for Bird Conservation". Leaflets about the impact of agriculture chemical fertilizer and pesticide on people, wildlife, and wetland were produced to be distributed to villagers for awareness of their fertilizer and pesticide usage. The education audio was recorded as awareness raising tools to play during the awareness parade.  University students learned about wetland ecology and how to identify the birds. ⓒDoFWC, MOE/Birdlife/WWT/NatureLife On 9th May 2018, participants and university students traveled to Anlung Pring Protected Landscape to learn about site conservation, ecotourism and bird identification. Site manager, partner NGOs and head of community based ecotourism briefly introduced site management, ecotourism operation and Sarus Crane conservation at the site. With guiding from conservationist, university students walked to the wetland station and learned about wetland ecology and using of telescope/binocular for birding. In addition, students also participated in finding birds challenge which was conducted in the wetland station where students able to spot birds through telescope and record the name of each species they found in the bird log. The winner who was able to spot most of the species was provided a reward after finished the challenge. H.E Chea Sam Ang, Director General of General Directorate of Administration for Nature Conservation and Protection, Ministry of Environment gave remark at WMBD2018. ⓒ DoFWC, MOE/Birdlife/WWT/NatureLife On 10th May 2018, WMBD event took place at Thmor Berk Secondary School located nearby Anlung Pring Protected Landscaped with 450 participants, including students, university students, local authorities, villagers, conservation NGOs. It presided over by H.E Chea Sam Ang, Director General of General Directorate of Administration for Nature Conservation and Protection, Ministry of Environment and there were 4 speakers coming from different institutions but work together to conserve wetlands and migratory birds. The key message delivered by the speakers focused on "Together to conserve Migratory Birds". The activities followed by the event included Question and Answer section to students, bird drawing competition, poem recitation, bird watching, and distribution of awareness materials. The event also involved awareness parade in and around the villages to distribute leaflets about the impact of using agriculture chemical fertilizer and pesticide to human, wildlife and wetlands. Participants get on tractors and some of them ride bicycles with the bird sign such as Sarus Crane and other waterbird species with the education audio being played. The parade started from Thmor Berk Secondary School along the village roads. It was not only for raising awareness to villagers about the impact of pesticide through audio and leaflets but also draw public's attention toward Sarus Crane and wetland conservation at Anlung Pring Protected Landscape. Students and participants joint the awareness parade on the impact of agriculture, chemical fertilizer, and pesticide to humans, wildlife and wetlands. ⓒ DoFWC, MOE/Birdlife/WWT/NatureLife The public event also captured and spread through Ministry of Environment and partner NGOs social media. The messages and the objective of this annual awareness event, WMBD, will reach more public attention toward conservation of migratory birds and their habitats. For more photographs, visit our Flickr album. For more footage, click here.  


    Continue reading
  • East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership Vacancy Announcement – IT Consultant

    EAAFP is seeking highly motivated individuals for the positions of IT and Website Specialist. Under the supervision of the Communication Officer and the Chief Executive of EAAFP, consultants will support the implementation of the Communication, Education, Participation and Awareness (CEPA) programme and activities of the Partnership. Here is the link for the position description, requirements and selection criteria.   Position: Consultant (IT consultant) Type of contract: 6 months contract Work percentage: 100% (full time) Languages: English and Korean  Deadline:  Expected start date: as soon as possible     How to apply   Those who are interested in working for an international organization in environment and nature conservation can send the set of documents to secretariat@eaaflyway.net with the EAAFP Job Application Form. Posting expires: Once the position is filled Email: secretariat@eaaflyway.net Location: G-Tower, Songdo, Incheon, Republic of Korea Please submit, CV/résumé EAAFP_Job_Application_Form A personal statement on the reason for applying and your career goal (up to one page) A reference letter (when requested)   If you have any questions, please send an email to danhak.gu@eaaflyway.net


    Continue reading
  • East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership Vacancy Announcement – Communication Consultant

    EAAFP is seeking highly motivated individuals for the positions of Communication Specialist. Under the supervision of the Communication Officer and the Chief Executive of EAAFP, consultants will support the implementation of the Communication, Education, Participation and Awareness (CEPA) programme and activities of the Partnership. Here is the link for the position description, requirements and selection criteria.   Position: Consultant (Communication consultant) Type of contract: July - December 2018 (6 months) Work percentage: 100% (full time) Languages: English and Korean  Deadline: 1 July 2018 Expected start date: July 2018   How to apply   Those who are interested in working for an international organization in environment and nature conservation can send the set of documents to secretariat@eaaflyway.net with the EAAFP Job Application Form. Posting expires: Once the position is filled Email: secretariat@eaaflyway.net Location: G-Tower, Songdo, Incheon, Republic of Korea Please submit, CV/résumé EAAFP_Job_Application_Form A personal statement on the reason for applying and your career goal (up to one page) A reference letter (when requested)   If you have any questions, please send an email to danhak.gu@eaaflyway.net


    Continue reading
  • World Migratory Bird Day 2018 – Indonesia

    Event Title: World…


    Continue reading
  • World Migratory Bird Day 2018- Bangladesh

    Event title:World Migratory Bird Day Event Organizer:Nature Conservation Society Participants: Nearly 1200. Most of them were school and college students & members of the local community Outcome:- Mass awareness for youth and local community for the conservation of wetlands and supported species, specifically migratory birds.- Motivation of policy makers, social and media personnel.- Conservation education program for school and college teachers. Summary:In Bangladesh World Migratory Bird Day 2018 was celebrated in a colorful way. The main event was conducted in Shunamgonj. On 10th May a colorful rally was organized by Nature Conservation Society with the help of local Forest Division followed by a seminar at Shaheed Abul Hossain Auditorium, Shunamgong. Near about thousand took part in that rally in which most of them were school and college children & haor community people. Representatives from District Administration, Police Department, NGOs, College and School, Co-management Council, Local Government, Forest Department, Fisheries Department, Environment Department and University teachers were also present as the resources person of that program. 03 presentations on Migratory Birds & Biodiversity of Wetlands were presented in the seminar. At the end of the seminar, a shot drama was presented by the Nature Conservation & Study Club of Jagannath University on the importance of migratory birds and wetland. The aim of this program at the migratory birds habitat site was to raise awareness and the get involvement of next generation of the local community towards conservation of migratory birds and its habitat. For more photographs, visit our Flickr album.


    Continue reading
  • How did the EAAFP Secretariat celebrate WMBD in May 2018?

    The East Asian – Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) has been celebrating the World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) from 2006 to raise awareness of the importance of the conservation of migratory waterbirds and the sustainable management of their habitats. This year, 2018, the EAAFP Secretariat held two major events under the global WMBD theme of “Unifying Our Voices for Bird Conservation” in the Republic of Korea (ROK) where the Secretariat office is located. The first was a WMBD Student Seminar at the War Memorial of Korea, and the second was a WMBD Reception at the Grand Hyatt Seoul. Additionally, WMBD Small Grants were provided to 5 country Partners of the EAAFP, and posters were distributed to more than 40 national wetland centers in the ROK. WMBD Student Seminar On 11 May 2018, with the sponsorship of National Geographic Society-Asia, a WMBD Student Seminar was organized in very fine weather at the War Memorial, Seoul. The young enthusiastic students and local citizens from 1 middle school, 8 high schools and 6 universities gathered at the seminar to learn about the wonder of waterbirds migration and the importance of the conservation of the birds and their habitats through talks, multimedia, and the group discussion. Four active bird conservationists in East Asia were invited to give inspirational lectures on the occasion of the World Migratory Bird Day and National Geographic’s Year of the Bird Campaign. The event began with the participants taking a tour of the National Geographic Photo Ark Exhibition, before being divided into six groups for group discussions on the EAAFP’s key species and the Year of Knots (2017-2018): Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Baer’s Pochard, Black-faced Spoonbill, Scaly-sided Merganser, Saunders’s Gull and Red Knot and Great Knot. Under the guidance of the invited speakers and facilitators, each bird named groups learnt about the characteristics (appearance, ecology, migration and conservation) of the key species. After a short discussion, the representatives of each group presented their birds and even suggested creative conservation method based on the birds’ ecology and migration. It was a great chance for young future conservationists to realize the importance of people’s interest in conserving the waterbirds with different measures. WMBD seminar group discussion ⓒEAAFP The last part of the Student Seminar was civil science lectures from the four speakers. Before the speech, a new EAAFP Introduction video was shown to convey the importance of flyways and the achievements of the EAAFP. Dr. Lew Young, Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat and Mr. Jay Lee, Executive Director of National Geographic Society – Asia delivered welcome speeches. After that, Dr. Youngmin Moon, a Korea project coordinator of Birdlife International, delivered a talk entitled “Why birds matter” and emphasized on stopping the human-induced rapid decline of avian population. Mr. Terry Townshend, a passionate conservationist based in China, shared his experience in tagging GPS device on swifts and cuckoos in Beijing, and showed the amazing migratory routes of these birds through the tracking results. Ms. Emilia Lai, a young shorebird conservationist, introduced the Great Knot and Red Knot including their migration and talked about the importance of mudflats. Finally, Dr. Changyong Choi, a Senior Researcher in Seoul National University, focused on the threats facing murrelets in the R.O. Korea, such as from exotic predators such as cats, gillnet bycatch and oil contamination. However, more studies are needed to understand murrelets and to implement adequate conservation actions. WMBD seminar group photo ⓒEAAFP More pictures and result papers of the group discussion can be found in the EAAFP Flickr account. WMBD Reception In the evening of the same day, the EAAFP Secretariat organized a reception to celebrate WMBD in Seoul Grand Hyatt Hotel. The objective of the event was to raise awareness on the need for international cooperation to conserve migratory waterbirds and their habitats in East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF). Approximately 70 participants gathered at the reception to celebrate the WMBD, including representatives from the Embassies of the EAAF Country Partner, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, National Institute of Biological Research (NIBR), other governmental organizations, international and multi-lateral organizations, NGOs, universities, research institutes, and private companies. The diplomatic representatives included H.E. Mr. Wei Kiat Yip, the Ambassador of Singapore, H.E. Mr. Andrew Yamanea, the Ambassador of Papua New Guinea, as well as representatives from the Embassies of Australia, Cambodia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar and the United States of America. The reception began at 17:30 in Namsan III hall with an opening remark by Dr. Lew Young, the Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat. He welcomed the guests and opened the floor by explaining the significance of the EAA Flyway. He said “East Asian-Australian Flyway is used by some 50 million waterbirds from 200 species. These birds are now flying to their breeding grounds as far north as the Russian Far East and Alaska and along the way, many will stop off to rest and refuel at one of many sites, including the critically important tidal-flat sites around the Yellow Sea.” He thanked for the strong cooperation made by EAAF Partners, government of Korea, international organizations, NGOs, research institutes and the private sector while urging continuous support. “More needs to be done to conserve these wonderful migratory waterbirds and their habitats, and one of the important steps is to raise greater awareness, such as through events like the WMBD” he added. Dr. Lew Young, the Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat ⓒEAAFP Following the opening remark, Dr. Minhwan Suh, the Acting President of the National Institute of Biological Resources(NIBR), delivered a congratulatory remark, stating the role of the Korean Peninsula in conserving migratory waterbirds and biodiversity in the region. “The Korean Peninsula, located on the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, plays an important role as a stopover of many migratory birds along the flyway,” he said. After the remarks, two videos regarding East Asian and Australasian Flyway by EAAFP and Birdwatchers by Sony Korea were played. Sony Korea provided sponsorship cameras (model: RX10 IV) to EAAFP in celebration of 2018 WMBD. These will be used for bird watching and wildlife photography. Ceremony with Sony ⓒEAAFP Group photographs were taken, firstly with the diplomatic representatives and then secondly with all the participants. Afterwards, a light buffet dinner was served over the scenic view of central Seoul. The participants freely mingled and networked with other participants. WMBD reception group photo ⓒEAAFP More pictures can be found on the EAAFP Flickr account. EAAFP WMBD Small Grants & Social Media Campaign To encourage developing countries in EAAF to celebrate 2018 WMBD, the EAAFP Secretariat supported WMBD events in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Mongolia and Vietnam through 2018 EAAFP WMBD Small Grants Programme. Ranging from government body to local citizen of the EAAF sites, each country came up with national and regional plans for WMBD celebrations. The Secretariat is very grateful for the active support by EAAFP Partners for the global WMBD campaign along the EAAF. Click here to see different languages of the 2018 WMBD theme and posters.  Click here for more information on WMBD 2018.  In parallel, the EAAFP Secretariat coordinated a national Instagram campaign which distributed the Korean language version of the WMBD Poster to national wetland/bird/ecology centers, NGOs, etc., and if people take photos with the posters in a creative way, they would win a small gift prepared by the EAAFP Secretariat. As from 2018, the WMBD will be twice a year, on the second Saturday in May and in October. The EAAFP Secretariat will continue supporting 2018 WMBD theme by encouraging Partners to organize events and campaigns to conserve migratory waterbirds and their habitats in our Flyway! 


    Continue reading
  • State of the Worlds’ Birds 2018

    Birdlife International has just released their ‘State of the World’s Birds 2018’ report [link]. This provides statistics showing that at least 40% of bird species worldwide (3,967) have declining populations, compared with 44% that are stable (4,393). The cause of the decline was put on agricultural expansion, logging, overexploitation, urbanisation, pollution, disturbance and the effects of invasive alien species. Longer term, human-induced climate change may prove to be the most serious threat of all. Most species are impacted by multiple threats and many threats are interrelated. In the EAAF region, unsustainable and poorly planned infrastructure development is highlighted as one of the main causes of the decline of bird numbers. The intertidal habitats around the Yellow Sea is one of the most important stopover sites along the EAAF, used by tens of millions of long-distance migratory shorebirds to rest and refuel. Unfortunately, the area’s mudflats have been progressively lost to land reclamation for agriculture, ports, industrial developments and urbanisation. Two-thirds of the Yellow Sea’s intertidal habitat has been reclaimed since the 1950s. In China, nearly 40% has been lost since the 1980s. Shorebird population declines have been estimated at 43-78% over the last 15 years, with Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris populations having declined by over 80%. Ultimately, human overconsumption lies behind the global biodiversity crisis and efforts to identify, conserve and restore critical habitats for birds is already showing that the decline can be slowed. Education and awareness raising is another important tool to convince the wider community of the importance of bird conservation and to take appropriate action.


    Continue reading