• “Tackling Impact on Seabirds by Light Pollution at Sea” Webinar

    Following the 2022 World Migratory Bird Day theme highlighting the impact of Light Pollution on…


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  • Winners of 2022 “Year of the Terns” Photo Contest Announced!

        On the second peak of 2022 World Migratory Bird Day (8th October, 2022), the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) Secretariat and its Seabird Working Group announced the results of…


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  • New Zealand Government launched a online tool of using birds to track light pollution at sea

    New research has expanded our understanding of which migratory bird species are most threatened by light pollution at sea. A fishing…


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  • The Philippines conducts its 1st National Training on Seabird Identification and Monitoring

    In the effort to increase our knowledge and capacities in conserving seabirds in the Philippines, the Biodiversity Management Bureau of the Department of…


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  • Australia’s Wildlife Conservation Plan for Seabirds

    At the national level in Australia, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act) provides for the development and…


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  • Masked Future

    The article I wrote, ‘Are the Masked Boobies Home for Good In Tubbataha? A rollercoaster ride on the wings of hope’, was published at the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership website in 2020.  It was filled with hope and a smattering of apprehension and despair.  Then, I was confident that we would see the resurgence of the masked booby Sula dactylatra population in the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park Flyway Network Site (EAAF 123) in the Philippines. This singular pair of masked boobies known in the Philippines, has been with us since 2019.  The second batch of eggs that it laid resulted in one chick that grew to five months, but which the rangers later found dead for unknown reasons. Marine park rangers regularly monitor the seabirds of Tubbataha, with special attention given to this finicky pair. Rangers built a complicated drainage network to rival that of ancient Rome to ensure the nests remain dry during the rainy season.  They would practically walk on tiptoes around these celebrities for fear of causing undue stress. Five times more the pair laid eggs, usually a couple, and these would disappear without a trace, a mystery we have since brought to the attention of seabird experts worldwide through various seabird expert groups.  Luckily for us, many were willing to help. Dr. Enriqueta Velarde of the Pacific Seabird group introduced us to Dr. Roxana Torres of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, who specializes in boobies.  Like us, Dr. Torres was disconcerted by the breeding failure of our Masked Boobies. At her behest, we tagged the two Masked Booby with metal and plastic ring bands during our seabird census in May 2022 for identification.  We are poised to install a camera trap to monitor their breeding behavior and to identify the ‘thief’ of their precious eggs.  And so, it is time to wait, to be patient, and to observe in silence. Figure 1. Park ranger, Segundo Conales, and reseracher, Ace Acebuque, installed rings on our lone Masked Booby pair. © B.Jimenez/TMO This couple laid seven pairs of eggs in two years, laying eggs almost every other month during the first quarter of this year alone.  It earnestly wants to survive and is working double-time to perpetuate the species.  As it is, we can but wait and do what little we can to unmask the future that lies ahead.  Meanwhile, the Masked Booby colony we dream of will have to wait. Figure 2. Masked Booby 446 and 256 now sport colored and metal wedding rings. © R.Alarcon/TMO If you have any advice for us, we would be so happy to hear from you! Email Tubbataha at tmo@tubbatahareefs.org or message via Facebook page: @OfficialTubbataha Learn more about this site: https://www.eaaflyway.net/philippines/ Prepared by Angelique Songco, Superintendent, Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park Flyway Network Site


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  • Join 2022 “Year of the Terns” Photo Contest

      English Simplified Chinese Traditional Chinese Japanese Korean Indonesian Official Photo Contest website: https://woobox.com/dsmyac Photo Contest Guidelines PDF: English / Bahasa Indonesia / Chinese [Simplified / Traditional] / Japanese/ Korean For more in Japanese, visit the Wild Bird Society of Japan (WBSJ) website: https://www.wbsj.org/activity/event/terns-photocontest-2022/ Learn more about the "Year of the Terns" campaign, click here. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//woobox.com/js/plugins/woo.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'woobox-sdk')); Photo Contest Judges Meet the "Year of the Terns" Photo Contest Judging Panel:   Prof. Daniel Roby Dedicated to Seabird research and conservation for over 25 years, Professor Daniel Roby was enthralled by wildlife from a very young age. Dan has had an illustrious career as an educator and conservationist, recently receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Pacific Seabird Group. He has also been involved in countless projects ranging from studying the long-term effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on seabirds in Alaska to becoming the technical advisor for the restoration of the Critically Endangered Chinese Crested Tern in China. Currently retired, Dan is working on editing a book on the conservation and restoration of Oregon’s birds.   Ms. Angelique Songco Starting her career in the Armed Forces of the Philippines, later becoming a diving instructor after falling in love with the ocean, Angelique Songco has more than 20 years of experience as a site manager of Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park, an UNESCO World Heritage Site and Flyway Network Site. Referred to as “Mama Ranger,” Angelique is also a member of the EAAFP Seabird Working group and works on the frontier in safeguarding important sites. With Angelique at the helm, Tubbataha received the Platinum Global Ocean Refuge Award – acknowledged as a model site and one of the best-managed marine protected areas in the world.   Dr. Kiyoaki Ozaki Dr. Ozaki has fifty years of experience as a wildlife biologist and conservationist working in Japan and Southeast Asian countries, with special interests in Okinawa Rail, Short-tailed Albatross, Japanese Crested Ibis, Roseate and Black-naped Terns. His studies include ecology, migration and conservation biology. He was also responsible for running the bird banding program in Japan between 1995-2017. Dr. Ozaki is the Deputy Director-General of Yamashina Institute for Ornithology since 2010, as the President of the Japanese Bird Banding Association since 2022, and as the President of Ornithological Society of Japan from 2018-2021.   Ms. Edin Whitehead As a seabird scientist and conservation photographer in Aotearoa, New Zealand, Edin  “combines science and storytelling to help people explore our natural world.” She works for the Northern New Zealand Seabird Trust as a biologist and photographer. She additionally spends her ‘free’ time in the wilderness, on conservation projects as a volunteer, or out at sea, to inspire people to explore, understand and conserve our earth. Edin is a doctoral researcher at the University of Auckland. She also teaches photography workshops or guides pelagic trips to take people to see seabirds that live in the Aotearoa area.   Mr. Yat-tung Yu Yat-tung Yu, a veteran birdwatcher, has always been fascinated by seabirds, particularly terns. He initiated the breeding tern survey in Hong Kong in 1998 and continues to conduct and promote tern ringing locally in Hong Kong and in the EAA Flyway. Despite his efforts, however, terns unfortunately still receive little attention from people in the region. Regardless, he aims to further promote tern research and conservation activities to save them from various threats. Currently, Yat-tung is the Director of the Hong Kong Bird Watching Society and Coordinator of the EAAFP Seabird Working Group.


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  • EAAFP Secretariat and Seabird Working Group launches “Year of the Terns” in 2022

    On 22nd February, 2022, the EAAFP Secretariat and EAAFP Seabird Working Group announced 2022 as the “Year of the Terns” for the EAA Flyway. The announcement is a preface to the focus that EAAFP will put on raising awareness and promoting collaboration for the conservation of seabirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAA Flyway). The campaign was officially launched during the 49th Annual Meeting of Pacific Seabird Group (PSG) Northeast Asia Seabird Conservation Committee Meeting. There are over 150 seabird species in the EAA Flyway. Many seabird species have long trans-equatorial migration routes and spend most of the year at sea, only returning to land to breed. Since much of their annual lifecycle is spent offshore, they are especially difficult to study and most aspects of their life histories remain poorly understood in the EAA Flyway. While many populations are doing well, others are experiencing population declines that are difficult to detect given the months they remain away from global eyes. To increasing awareness of these Ocean Sentinels, the Secretariat and the EAAFP Seabird Working Group are excited to designate 2022 as the “Year of the Terns”. The Secretariat and the EAAFP Seabird Working Group hope to accomplish the following three objectives with this campaign: 1. To raise awareness of seabirds, especially terns, within EAA Flyway 2. To encourage dialogues and collaboration on seabirds research and conservation within EAA Flyway 3. To promote and strengthen working relationships within EAAFP Seabird Working Group, also with site managers of Flyway Network Sites for seabirds, and beyond To do so, seven, out of the 16 EAA Flyway tern species, were selected for the campaign, including the Chinese Crested Tern (CR), Aleutian Tern (VU), Greater Crested Tern, Bridled Tern, Little Tern, Black-naped Tern and Roseate Tern. The Secretariat and Seabird WG will also be developing activities for the campaign accordingly. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP Seabird Working Group, expressed “According to a global assessment, seabirds are generally more threatened than other comparable groups of birds. Many populations have declined rapidly in recent decades due to various threats, including incidental bycatch, overfishing, pollution, invasive species, warming oceans and more. We hope that the “Year of the Terns” campaign, will raise awareness about seabirds, both for the health of their populations, and as an indicator of the health of oceans on which seabirds and all of us depend. We are excited for this opportunity for more joint actions to conserve seabirds in the EAA Flyway and expand the Seabird Working Group’s network of partners.” Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of EAAFP Secretariat said. “Seabirds received relatively less attention and conservation effort in the EAA Flyway compared to other taxa, probably due to the vast distribution range of many species and the challenges to study them. Therefore, we need to strengthen our network in seabird studies and conservation and promote more collaboration in the region, and the actions cannot be delayed.” Stay tuned for more upcoming activities such as a photo competition and a talk series. The EAAFP Secretariat and Seabird Working Group invite everyone to support and celebrate the “Year of the Terns with them! Check the “Year of the Terns” webpage: https://www.eaaflyway.net/year-of-the-terns-2022/ For inquiries and interest to support the Year of the Terns, please contact: Ms. Vivian Fu Communication Officer, EAAFP Secretariat Email: communication@eaaflyway.net


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  • Christmas Frigatebirds in the Busy Bay of Jakarta Bay, Indonesia – A Documentary Film for Christmas Frigatebird Conservation in Indonesia

    Documentary films can be a perfect platform to create dialogue and raise awareness for both individual and broader social change.  Seabirds Indonesia…


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  • Report of the Breeding Bird Atlas of Japan -Mapping the present status of Japan’s birds 2016-2021.

    Japan Bird Research Association has recently published “Report of the Breeding Bird Atlas of Japan -Mapping the present status of Japan’s birds…


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