• 2022 World Migratory Bird Day Celebration in West, South and Eastern Mongolia

    The celebration of World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) 2022 in Mongolia by Wildlife Science and Conservation Center (WSCC) in West, South and Eastern Mongolia was a success. WSCC, Mongolia has been celebrated WMBD since 2010s by small grants or organization’s own funds every year with various public awareness activities following each year’s WMBD theme and slogan. Demo talk how to use opticals, Southern Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia The celebration was organized between 12 – 20 May in Western, Eastern and Southern Mongolia, supported by EAAFP WMBD small grant and cooperation with WWF Mongolia, Oyu Tolgoi LLC, and high schools of every soum (area of pastureland) in the vicinity. All three sites were very special places for migratory birds and thus, it is very important to involve local kids and teachers to explain the bird species around the home. Students bird watching, Western Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Demonstration talk of how, why we ring birds, Western Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Over 910 participants have been reached out through this event to share about bird research and migratory birds’ conservation, especially how to deal with light pollution to protect migratory birds and other animals. Many of the school students joined this kind of activities for the first time to learn  about WMBD, and they would keep this memory of the event  in their hearts. Releasing Siberian Rubythroat, Eastern Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Two competitions, birdwatching competition and bird drawing competition, were very attractive to all kids, and they enjoyed learning about birds and bird migration through these two competitions. Most importantly, the two ringing stations also tremendously aided in the learning - on bird study and conservation - for all attendees and their knowledge have greatly strengthened for their future, proven by the fact that several students have been started volunteering as an assistant ringer position when they have free time afterschool. Children heading out for the bird ringing activity, Eastern Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Drawing competition in progress at the Khurkh BRS, Eastern Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Information leaflets were distributed among all participants in E and Western Mongolia. A total 12 winners of two competitions were rewarded with education materials such bird guidebook and wildlife conservation related books and painting materials. Presentations in Western Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia In the Western Mongolian activities were supported by WWF Mongolia, and they helped us with arranging education materials and rewards for the contest winners. Mongolian Bird Watching club members celebrated Global Big Day on 14 May as well, Team Mongolia observed 254 species in 24 hours, and was one of the biggest successes among the team members. They are very proud of their bird’s species diversity and were encouraged by our results which was 4th place in the Asia and 16th place in the world team rank. Many young members of the Team Mongolia were motivated for bird watching and delighted by our team efforts for Global Big Day. Students birdwatching, Southern Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Team recording what they saw, Southern Mongolia ©️ Wildlife Science and Conservation Center - Mongolia Article prepared by Mongolia by Wildlife Science and Conservation Center (WSCC).


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  • Official Launching of the Regional Flyways Initiative Webpage

    The EAAFP Secretariat is pleased to announce the release of a webpage built up for the Regional Flyway Initiative (RFI). The page was set up to archive RFI-related documents, articles, media, and events for information sharing. A brief introduction of RFI, key documents (RFI Technical Assistance Report and EAAFP Strategic Plan 2019-2028), a list of meetings and webinars, articles, and publications linked to RFI are also available. Link: https://www.eaaflyway.net/regional-flyway-initiative/ The Regional Flyway Initiative was launched in October 2021 by joint efforts with Asian Development Bank, EAAFP, and BirdLife International at the Ecological Civilization Forum of the 15th Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP15). The Regional Flyway Initiative seeks to develop a long-term financing program to protect and restore EAAF wetland ecosystems and the services they provide. RFI aims to mobilize large-scale financing to support the protection, maintenance, and restoration of wetlands in East and Southeast Asia, especially coastal wetlands. The initiative aims to strengthen the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands across the region, which are crucial for the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people and the migratory waterbirds in Asia and the Pacific. This will be achieved through partnerships among governments, non-government organizations, local communities, regional organizations, development agencies, private sectors, and other stakeholders.


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  • Baer’s Pochard and Ferruginous Duck at Chukh Lake, Northeast Mongolia

    The Chukh Bird Research Station (CBRS) is located on the…


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  • EAAFP MOP11 – 4th Notification to Partners

    With regards to the continuing COVID-19 global pandemic situation, international travel measures and restrictions imposed in many Partner countries, the Australian Government and BirdLife Australia have proposed revised dates regarding the hosting of MoP11 to the 12th -17th March, 2023 in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. The EAAFP Management Committee has accepted the generous hosting offer from the Australian co-hosts. The Management Committee also endorsed the Secretariat organizing a series of webinars to increase dialogue with and between Partners. This is also an opportunity for Partners to be briefed on important issues to be tabled for consideration at MoP11, including Activities of the Secretariat; Draft Guidelines for National/Site Partnerships and Sister Site Programme; Migratory Waterbird Conservation Status Review; Update on the ADB Regional Flyway Initiative; Briefing on the proposed Partner Reporting Template for MoP 11, etc. The webinars are proposed for June, 2022. Further notification and details will be announced in due course. The EAAFP Secretariat regrets any inconvenience caused by the postponement of MoP. The Secretariat will continue its work and update Partners, Working Groups and Task Forces on issues and the proposed decision papers related to MoP11 via email, the MoP11 webpage , and social media channels. Please feel free to contact the Secretariat at secretariat@eaaflyway.net for any relevant inquiries.


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  • The First Asian Ornithological Conference convened

    The last two decades have seen a tremendous increase in the development of scientific studies and conservation of birds in Asia. The…


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  • Official Launching of Regional Flyway Initiative

    On 14th October, The East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP), in cooperation with the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and BirdLife International today launched the Regional Flyway Initiative (RFI), a long-term…


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  • EAAFP Webinar for Government Focal Points on the ADB Regional Flyway Initiative

      On 6th October, the EAAFP Secretariat organized a webinar for EAAFP Government Focal Points on the Asian Development Bank’s Regional Flyway Initiative…


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2021 May Event– Mongolia (Mongolian Bird Conservation Center)

    Event title: Celebrated World Migratory Bid Day – 2021 at Chukh Bird Research Station (CBRS), Eastern Mongolia Date: 10th August, 2021 Organizer: Chukh Bird Research Station (CBRS) of Mongolian Bird Conservation Center of…


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  • Mongolian Bird Ringing Program – 2020 Annual Report

    In Mongolia, bird ringing activities started relatively recently. The first stationary bird ringing scheme was established in 2015 by Wildlife Science and Conservation Center of Mongolia (WSCC) at the…


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  • First GPS tracking study of the Dalmatian Pelican in East Asia

    After several years of careful planning, Mongolian biologists captured and color-banded 13 juvenile Dalmatian Pelicans at Khar Us Lake National Park (Flyway Network Site EAAF 128) in August 2020. Because the population situation is too fragile due to its extremely low number, we sought various advice about the methods and tools that can be used to capture and mark them. We invited experts from Greece and Russia with field experiences in handling and marking pelicans and asked for practical advice before we lay hands on pelicans. Juvenile Dalmatian Pelicans © Nyambayar Batbayar/ WSCC of Mongolia In addition to alphanumeric yellow color bands, which were donated by Society for the Protection of Prespa (SPP). We deployed two GSM GPS transmitters as backpack on the two biggest juveniles. Those two transmitters were donated by BirdsData, a Chinese GPS transmitter manufacturer. We were all excited. Thankfully the transmitters are working well to date despite having some difficulties to transmit the data on regular basis in the wintering area because of the frequent condition of having thick clouds. Migration of the first juvenile pelican started on 25th September  and arrived at its final destination in Wenzhou Bay in East China on 8th January, after travelling over 4,200 km distance in 105 days. The second juvenile started its migration on 2nd October and arrived at the same place on 8th December after travelling over 3,800 km in 62 days. They used similar routes and made 14-15 stops during this migration. Both birds flew between stopovers on an average 5-9 hours from the morning till the evening until they reach a night roost. It seems their successful migration highly depends on available night time roosts during this long journey. We were astonished by seeing both birds have roosted on open steppe area in the middle of Gobi desert, most likely an area without open water. One of these dry roosts was even located in the middle of a busy road. High precision GPS tracks of one bird showed that it walked about 17 km after it landed on an open area and changed its locations three times on that night. It must have been hard for the pelicans to spend the night on such dry roosts. Fortunately, both birds spent the nights safely and continued their migration next day without any incident. Migration route of two juvenile Dalmatian Pelican with GSM GPS transmitters © Nyambayar Batbayar/ WSCC of Mongolia Compared to populations in other parts of the range, Dalmatian pelicans in East Asia make the longest migration. The tracking data showed that the two tagged pelicans made regular daily stops when flying through Mongolia until they reached their first stopover site in China. We were relieved when birds safely arrived at Yellow River in Inner Mongolia, because it is the largest open water where the pelicans rested since they left Orog and Boontsagaan Lake in Mongolia, which is over 1,000 km distance. Once birds reached China, the number of wetlands where they can rest seems to be more abundant. However, the birds also seem to be quite picky when choosing stopover sites. At the moment, we are not completely sure what makes them choose one site over another. We will need more tracking data to draw some meaningful conclusions about their stopover site selection. Two pelicans stopped at several locations along the east coast of China such as Beidagang Reservoir, Yellow River Delta, Haizhou Bay, Zhonglu Harbor, Daiyugang outflow, Yangze River, Hangzhou Bay, Taizhou Bay, and Wenzhou Bay. They all seem to be extremely important for Dalmatian Pelicans to successfully continue their migration. It is crucial to ensure the connectivity of these sites to sustain their migration. Since the two tagged pelicans arrived in China, birdwatchers and conservationists in China are helping us to report the location and number of pelicans. We appreciate their help very much, because they are making really important contributions for the conservation of the pelican. The sharing of inforamtion help the researchers to understand more about the species and the causes of their decline. The latest report from the Wenzhou Bay came 2 days ago saying the pelicans might have started heading back to the north. This migration study was a part of the joint conservation efforts by the East Asia-Australasian Flyway Partnership’s Dalmatian Pelican Task Force. The goal of the Dalmatian Pelican Task Force is to restore the East Asian population of Dalmatian Pelican to a positive growth rate for a period of at least three generations. We cannot accomplish this goal alone, we need help from everyone who cares for this giant yet beautiful bird. Article prepared by Nyambayar Batbayar and Batmunkh Davaasuren, Wildlife Science and Conservation Center of Mongolia Taking body measurement of the juvenile Dalmatian Pelican in Mongolia © Nyambayar Batbayar/ WSCC of Mongolia


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