• World Migratory Bird Day 2021 invites us to reconnect with Nature by appreciating “bird songs and flight”

    The World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD), a global annual campaign is held on every second Saturday of May and October, to raise awareness of migratory birds and calls for…


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  • Some updates on colour legflags used in Southern China

    Marking migratory waterbirds with metal rings, wing tags, neck bands, leg rings and flags, nasal discs, telemetry equipment like GPS devices, is an important way of studying their migration….


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  • Kick-starting the first EAAFP Conservation Status Review

    The 1% waterbird population estimate threshold is a key criterion for identifying sites of international importance, including designating Ramsar Sites and EAAFP Flyway Network Sites. Thus, this information of waterbird population estimates needs to be regularly updated. To ensure researchers, government agencies, conservationists and other stakeholders can get access to up-to-date information of waterbird population estimate, EAAFP MoP 10 adopted Decision 12 “Development of a Conservation Status Review of Migratory Waterbird Populations for the EAAFP” in 2018. To proceed with the development of the Conservation Status Review (CSR), the EAAFP Secretariat has contracted Wetlands International (EAAFP Partner) to coordinate the preparation of the first CSR in 2021-2022. This will be implemented in close consultation with the Technical Sub-Committee, Science Unit of the Secretariat, Partners, Working Groups, Task Forces and other experts. To inform all Partners, Working Groups/ Task Forces and other stakeholders about this important project and to seek comments, advice and support, a webinar on the EAAFP Conservation Status Review was organized on 8th April 2021, co-hosted by EAAFP Secretariat (Incheon and Beijing offices) and Wetlands International. A total of 99 participants, from thirteen of sixteen Working Groups and Task Forces, and 10 Partners participated. In Session 1, EAAFP Chair, Mr. Robb Kaler emphasised the importance of Decision 12 adopted at MOP10  and invited all Partners, Working Groups, Task Forces and experts to participate in this project. Ms. Tomoko Ichikawa, Japan Focal Point of EAAFP, also stressed the importance of up-to-date 1% thresholds for EAAFP Network Sites and Ramsar site designation, as well as the importance of national monitoring programmes to provide baseline information to enhance conservation measures. After that, Dr. Taej Mundkur, Senior Technical Officer of Wetlands International introduced the background of the first CSR (CSR 1), the proposed timeline of the project that will cover over 250 biogeographic populations of about 210 species and preparation of final results that would be presented at MoP11. He also established a baseline of seeking feedback during the consultation, recognizing knowledge gaps for some waterbird groups and suggested ways to address these. Session 2 was moderated by Mr. Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat. This session focused on engagement and contributing to the Conservation Status Review during 2021. Dr. Mundkur continued to introduce the scope and consultation process including a review on population size estimates, population trends, boundary maps, and provided details of the timeline of the deliverables. Followed by Mr. Tom Langendoen, Technical Officer of Wetlands International, who demonstrated the use of the CSR Consultation Portal for experts to provide population-level feedback during the review process as well as feedback on waterbird population boundary maps. After the introductory sessions, the floor was open for Q & A. Participants actively engaged in the discussion. Many important issues were raised by the participants on reviewing process, refining scope of population to be reviewed, supports to fill in gaps and mobilize experts to contribute, and application of the review to conservation. The webinar ended with closing remarks by Mr. Robb Kaler. Watch the webinar: PPT Presentation by Dr. Taej Mundkur: Session 1: Click here to view Session 1 PPT Presentation Session 2: Click here to view Session 2 PPT Presentation Demonstration videos by Mr. Tom Langendoen on: 1. Commenting WPE  https://www.eaaflyway.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/1.-WPEcommenting.mp4   2. Reviewing Boundary map https://www.eaaflyway.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/2.-Boundaries.mp4   For further information and inquiries, please contact: Dr. Taej Mundkur (Wetlands International) Email: Taej.Mundkur@wetlands.org Dr Qing Zheng (EAAFP Science Unit) Email: science@eaaflyway.net


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  • Far Eastern Curlew Important Site on Sumatra Island, Indonesia

    Far Eastern Curlew is the largest shorebird in the world. It is an endemic shorebird in East Asian-Australasian Flyway. The global trend of the Far Eastern Curlew population has…


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  • Record breaking for Black-faced Spoonbills population hits over 5,000 in 2021

    The Hong Kong Bird Watching Society (HKBWS), EAAFP Partner, coordinated the  International Black-faced Spoonbill Census 2021 (the Census) from 15th to 17th January. The global population of the Endangered…


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  • MOU Signing Ceremony between EAAFP Foundation and Yeonsu Foundation for Arts and Culture

    EAAFP Foundation and Yeonsu Foundation for Arts and Culture staffs are taking a picture after the MOU signing ceremony…


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  • First council meeting of Incheon Black-faced Spoonbill (BFS) Conservation Guild

    On 5th March 2021 the first council meeting of Incheon Black-faced Spoonbill (BFS) Conservation Guild (hereinafter referred to as “council meeting”) was convened by the National Institute of Ecology…


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  • 2021 Suncheon Bay Hooded Cranes International Symposium

    Every year, Suncheon City holds the festival of the Hooded Cranes in Suncheon Bay in Ro Korea (Flyway Network Site EAAF 079), as they designated 28th February as Suncheon…


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  • Research to conserve Baer’s Pochard in Pyu Lake and Paleik Inn, central Myanmar

    Data of population and distribution of Critically Endangered Baer’s Pochard was collected during various trips to Pyu Lake, Paleik Inn and Banaw freshwater lakes comprising four years of fieldwork…


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