• The training workshop for wardens/rangers to conserve Hwaseong wetlands (10 days in August & November, in the RO Korea)

    Birds Korea will hold a workshop to train the future local wardens to conserve the Hwaseong wetland for five days from 9th to 13th August with the support of…


    Continue reading
  • Join the #legflagchallenge and contribute to migratory bird conservation!

    This year, the EAAFP Secretariat is teaming up with the Oriental Bird Club, BirdLife International and the Spoon-billed Sandpiper Task Force, to launch…


    Continue reading
  • “Getbol, Korean Tidal Flats” inscribed on UNESCO World Heritage List

    On 26th July, 2021, the 44th Session of the World Heritage Committee endorsed the inscription of the Republic of Korea’s tidal flats on the UNESCO World Natural Heritage List, marking an enormous step forward to secure the critical habitats of the Yellow Sea for millions of migratory waterbirds that depend on this area as a vital stopover on their migratory journeys from as far away as Australia and New Zealand to breeding grounds in Arctic Russia and Alaska. Great Knot and Bar-tailed Godwit ©WH Promotion Team of Korean Tidal Flat The inscription of the “Getbol”, the Korean name for tidal flats, was announced during the World Heritage Committee meeting held in Fuzhou City, China and follows over 10 years of intensive preparation by the Korean authorities. The four sites included in the Phase I inscription of Seocheon Getbol, Gochang Getbol, Shinan Getbol and Boseong-Suncheon Getbol, collectively cover over 128,000 hectares of coastal wetlands in the Southwestern part of the country. Additional areas will be added as part of a Phase II nomination. The shallow waters in the Yellow Sea region jointly shared by China, DPR Korea and Ro Korea hold some of the largest and most spectacular intertidal wetlands in the world. These sites support exceptionally rich biodiversity, but are best known for some of the largest congregations of migratory waterbirds in eastern Asia, many of which are globally threatened by habitat loss along their migratory pathways, collectively known as the East Asian – Australasian Flyway. Up to 100,000 shorebirds use the mudflats around Yubu island in the Seocheon Getbol during migration, including the Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper and the Endangered Far Eastern Curlew. Other species, such as Vulnerable Saunders’s Gull and Endangered Black-faced Spoonbill stay to nest in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow Sea. “The inscription of the Getbol in the World Heritage List will mark a great shift of paradigm for Getbol tidal flats protection and management policy, as well as the increasing public awareness. The Getbol's World Heritage inscription means that the tidal flats managed by locals become a shared global property for the next generation of all humanity. All stakeholders involved with the Getbol will make the best effort to complete its Phase II extension and even further in the future.’’ said Dr. Kyong-O Moon, the Secretary-General of the Korea Getbol World Heritage Promotion Team. “The Korean Getbol inscription complements the “The Migratory Bird Sanctuaries along the Coast of the Yellow Sea-Bohai Gulf of China (Phase I)” World Heritage Site listed in 2019. It will strengthen international collaboration, particularly in the vision of transboundary joint efforts with China and DPR Korea, to conserve the wetlands of the Yellow Sea region, the irreplaceable migration hub for migratory waterbirds shared by the 22 countries in the Flyway,” said Mr. Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of EAAFP, an international partnership to conserve migratory waterbirds along the Flyway. “The UNESCO World Heritage Convention offers an exceptionally powerful framework to secure the future of globally important biodiversity. The BirdLife International Partnership look forward to working closely with the EAAFP and IUCN to secure the same status for the remaining such areas of the Yellow Sea, and to support the authorities to ensure all receive the best possible management for birds and people.’’ said Dr. Ding Li Yong, BirdLife International (Asia Division) Flyways Coordinator. Decision paper (download at: https://whc.unesco.org/en/sessions/44COM/documents/#amendment ) Far Eastern Curlew and others © WH Promotion Team of Korean Tidal Flat Black-faced Spoonbill © WH Promotion Team of Korean Tidal Flat Spoon-billed Sandpiper ©WH Promotion Team of Korean Tidal Flat Hooded Cranes in Suncheon Bay ©WH Promotion Team of Korean Tidal Flat Click [here] for the UNESCO WHC official announcement. Click [here] for the local news media archive. Local news reports:   Korean Version: 한국의 갯벌’, 유네스코 세계유산 등재 2021년 7월 26일 ‘한국의 갯벌’은 제 44차 세계유산위원회(WHC)에서 유네스코 세계자연유산으로 등재 됐다. 이 지역은 뉴질랜드· 호주부터 러시아 알래스카까지 이동하는 수백만 마리 철새의  황해 상 중간기착지로서  세계적으로 중요하고 의미있는 서식지 보전에 매우 큰 발걸음이 되었다. 중국 푸저우에서 열린 제44차 세계유산위원회는 한국의 갯벌을 세계자연유산 등재로 최종 확정했다. 이는 한국이 10년 간 준비한 작업의 성과라고 볼 수 있다. 1단계 세계자연유산 대상지로는 서천갯벌, 고창갯벌, 신안갯벌, 보성-순천갯벌, 4곳으로 총 12만8000ha가 넘는 서남해해안 습지이다. 2단계 추진과정에서 추가지역들이 포함될 예정이다. 중국과 남북한이 공유하고 있는 황해지역은 세계에서 가장 크고 장관을 이루는 조간대 습지다. 이 지역은  생물다양성이 매우 풍부하고, 최대 규모 집단인 동아시아 지역의 이동성 물새 서식지 감소로 인해 전 세계적으로 가장 위협을 받는 지역이며, 동아시아-대양주 철새이동경로 상에 있다. 멸종위기에 처한 넓적부리도요, 알락꼬리마도요를 포함 한 최대 10만 마리까지 이동 기간동안 유부도 주변(서천 갯벌)을 이용한다. 또한 취약종인 검은머리갈매기와 멸종위기종 저어새와 같은 다른 종은 황해 연안 습지에 둥지를 튼다. 한국 갯벌 세계유산 등재추진단 문경오 사무국장은  “한국의 갯벌 유네스코  세계유산 등재는 갯벌 보호  및 관리 정책의 패러다임을 전환하는 계기가 될 것 이며, 대중 인식 증진에도 큰 기여를 할 것이다.” 이어서 “한국의 갯벌 유네스코 세계유산 등재는 지역 주민이 관리하는 갯벌에서 더 나아가 전 지구적으로 공유하는 자산으로 모든 인류를 포함하여 다음 세대에 넘겨줄 자산이 된다는 의미다. 갯벌과 관련된 모든 이해관계자들은 2단계(Phase II)  상향과 향후 더 확장할 수 있도록 최선을 다할 것이다” 라고 말했다. 국제철새보호 기구 동아시아-대양주 철새이동경로 파트너십(EAAFP) 사무국  더그 와킨스(Doug Watkins) 대표는 “한국 갯벌 등재는 2019년 세계유산에 등재된 ‘중국 황하이 연안-보하이 만의 철새 보호구역(1단계)’을 보완한다. 특히 국경을 넘어 공동 비전인 황해 보전을 위해 중국과 남북한의 국제 협력과 황해 지역의 습지를 보전하여 대처할 수 없는 22개국이 함께 공유하는 철새이동경로 보전 노력이 강화 될 것” 이라고 말했다. 딩리 용(Ding Li Yong) 버드라이프 인터내셔널(BirdLife International) 아시아 지부 이동경로 코디네이터는 “유네스코 세계유산협약은 세계적으로 중요한 생물다양성의 미래를 보장하기 위한 매우 강력한 프레임워크를 제공한다. 버드라이프는 EAAFP및  유네스코 심사 자문기구인 세계자연보전연맹(IUCN) 과 긴밀히 협력하여 황해의 나머지 지역에도 동일하게 보전을 확보하여 당국이 조류와 인류을 위한 최상의 관리를 받을 수 있도록 지원하기를 기대한다” 라고 말했다.


    Continue reading
  • The 1st International Symposium on the Conservation of East Asian Population of the Dalmatian Pelican held in China

    From May 12-14, the Research Institute of Subtropical Forestry (RISF) of the Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF) and the Society of Entrepreneurs & Ecology (SEE) in Beijing co-hosted The…


    Continue reading
  • Recent work on seabird conservation in Northeast Asia – Summary of Northeast Asia seabird conservation committee meeting

    In conjunction with the Pacific Seabird Group Annual Meeting held virtually from 22 to 26 February, 2021, the Northeast Asia Seabird Conservation Committee…


    Continue reading
  • Australia published National Directory of Important Migratory Shorebird Habitat

    A National Directory of Important Migratory Shorebird Habitat ('Directory') was newly published by BirdLife Australia and supported by the Australian Government. The Directory identifies, and guides investment into the protection and restoration of, important migratory shorebird habitat around Australia. It builds community awareness and Indigenous knowledge, helps achieve the goals of the Australian Government’s Wildlife Conservation Plan for Migratory Shorebirds and contributes to the implementation of Australia’s international obligations to the conservation and management of migratory shorebirds. It is based on thousands of field surveys by volunteers and experts, millions of bird sightings and uses rigorous methodology to identify key sites, thus providing useful and objective guidance. Habitat is key: Populations of many species of migratory shorebirds have undergone substantial decline over recent and extended periods of time. As an example, numbers of Far Eastern Curlew (Numenius madagascariensis) have declined by more than 80% over the course of by now four decades. Halting this decline and reversing the current trend is without alternative if threatened species are to avoid extinction and continue to contribute as an integral component of Australia nation’s biodiversity to the functioning of Australia’s ecosystems. Actions and processes threatening migratory shorebird habitat have to be effectively recognized and mitigated. In order to achieve this, decision-makers and stakeholders around Australia need to be able to easily access information on the importance of sites for migratory shorebirds. The directory provides this crucial link which was not previously been available. The Directory also provides a starting point for a more comprehensive assessment of the current state of the habitat listed, a prioritization of sites according to current or future threats experienced and more targeted conservation action. This directly addresses and supports some of the priority actions in the Australian Government’s Wildlife Conservation Plan for Migratory Shorebirds across the main objectives: protection of important habitat, anthropogenic threat minimization or elimination and knowledge gap identification. A number of high priority projects are already in the process of being implemented, the Directory makes those more effective and targeted. The Directory is an important step towards effective migratory shorebird habitat protection around Australia. Revision of conservation and management plans for many sites may be necessary to reflect their importance. Specific site action plans detailing conservation measures to be taken for migratory shorebirds at a single site can be developed as a follow-up action. The directory thus also represents a key resource underpinning further conservation measures under Australia’s Conservation Action Plan for Migratory Shorebirds and other frameworks. The Australian Government, which provided gratefully acknowledged funding for this scientific project delivered by BirdLife Australia, has approved of the Directory after consultations with its Committees and all Australian States and Territories. The document has been officially launched on 21 April 2021. It is available for download in *.pdf format in its latest version: National Directory of Important Migratory Shorebird Habitat Download the complete Directory (one file or, due to file size, chapters separately) from the download folder. It is advised to always read the Introduction and Discussion alongside the chapter you need. Overview of chapters: Introduction and Methods Chapter 1 - External Territories Chapter 2 - New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory Chapter 3 - Northern Territory Chapter 4 - Queensland Chapter 5 - South Australia Chapter 6 - Tasmania Chapter 7 - Victoria Chapter 8 - Western Australia Chapter 9 - Species accounts (listing of sites by species, not by site) Discussion and Appendices Due to the large size of the document (1287 pages printed), there are no printed copies are available – please arrange for own printing and binding if desired. If you have feedback on the Directory process or the Directory itself, or you have additional data to contribute to a potential future revision, please write to directory.feedback@birdlife.org.au If you have other questions regarding the Directory, please contact shorebirds@birdlife.org.au For data extractions from BirdLife Australia’s  shorebird data holdings, see the Data Extractions section. Repost from BirdLife Australia news article: https://birdlife.org.au/projects/shorebirds/national-directory-ms-habitat (Released on: 21st April, 2021) Know more about Flyway Network Sites in Australia: www.eaaflyway.net/australia/  


    Continue reading
  • Kick-starting the first EAAFP Conservation Status Review

    The 1% waterbird population estimate threshold is a key criterion for identifying sites of international importance, including designating Ramsar Sites and EAAFP Flyway Network Sites. Thus, this information of waterbird population estimates needs to be regularly updated. To ensure researchers, government agencies, conservationists and other stakeholders can get access to up-to-date information of waterbird population estimate, EAAFP MoP 10 adopted Decision 12 “Development of a Conservation Status Review of Migratory Waterbird Populations for the EAAFP” in 2018. To proceed with the development of the Conservation Status Review (CSR), the EAAFP Secretariat has contracted Wetlands International (EAAFP Partner) to coordinate the preparation of the first CSR in 2021-2022. This will be implemented in close consultation with the Technical Sub-Committee, Science Unit of the Secretariat, Partners, Working Groups, Task Forces and other experts. To inform all Partners, Working Groups/ Task Forces and other stakeholders about this important project and to seek comments, advice and support, a webinar on the EAAFP Conservation Status Review was organized on 8th April 2021, co-hosted by EAAFP Secretariat (Incheon and Beijing offices) and Wetlands International. A total of 99 participants, from thirteen of sixteen Working Groups and Task Forces, and 10 Partners participated. In Session 1, EAAFP Chair, Mr. Robb Kaler emphasised the importance of Decision 12 adopted at MOP10  and invited all Partners, Working Groups, Task Forces and experts to participate in this project. Ms. Tomoko Ichikawa, Japan Focal Point of EAAFP, also stressed the importance of up-to-date 1% thresholds for EAAFP Network Sites and Ramsar site designation, as well as the importance of national monitoring programmes to provide baseline information to enhance conservation measures. After that, Dr. Taej Mundkur, Senior Technical Officer of Wetlands International introduced the background of the first CSR (CSR 1), the proposed timeline of the project that will cover over 250 biogeographic populations of about 210 species and preparation of final results that would be presented at MoP11. He also established a baseline of seeking feedback during the consultation, recognizing knowledge gaps for some waterbird groups and suggested ways to address these. Session 2 was moderated by Mr. Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat. This session focused on engagement and contributing to the Conservation Status Review during 2021. Dr. Mundkur continued to introduce the scope and consultation process including a review on population size estimates, population trends, boundary maps, and provided details of the timeline of the deliverables. Followed by Mr. Tom Langendoen, Technical Officer of Wetlands International, who demonstrated the use of the CSR Consultation Portal for experts to provide population-level feedback during the review process as well as feedback on waterbird population boundary maps. After the introductory sessions, the floor was open for Q & A. Participants actively engaged in the discussion. Many important issues were raised by the participants on reviewing process, refining scope of population to be reviewed, supports to fill in gaps and mobilize experts to contribute, and application of the review to conservation. The webinar ended with closing remarks by Mr. Robb Kaler. Watch the webinar: PPT Presentation by Dr. Taej Mundkur: Session 1: Click here to view Session 1 PPT Presentation Session 2: Click here to view Session 2 PPT Presentation Demonstration videos by Mr. Tom Langendoen on: 1. Commenting WPE  https://www.eaaflyway.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/1.-WPEcommenting.mp4   2. Reviewing Boundary map https://www.eaaflyway.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/2.-Boundaries.mp4   For further information and inquiries, please contact: Dr. Taej Mundkur (Wetlands International) Email: Taej.Mundkur@wetlands.org Dr Qing Zheng (EAAFP Science Unit) Email: science@eaaflyway.net


    Continue reading
  • Far Eastern Curlew Important Site on Sumatra Island, Indonesia

    Far Eastern Curlew is the largest shorebird in the world. It is an endemic shorebird in East Asian-Australasian Flyway. The global trend of the Far Eastern Curlew population has…


    Continue reading
  • MOU Signing Ceremony between EAAFP Foundation and Yeonsu Foundation for Arts and Culture

    EAAFP Foundation and Yeonsu Foundation for Arts and Culture staffs are taking a picture after the MOU signing ceremony…


    Continue reading