• EAAFP X YSFAC Bird Meets Arts Project International Workshop Successfully Concludes

    Participants making bird-like hand…


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  • YSFAC X EAAFP Programme Concluded With Art Exhibition

    On 2nd September, the <Bird Meets Arts> Closing Reception hosted by the EAAFP Foundation and (Yeonsu Foundation for Arts and Culture (YSFAC) took place in G Tower Gallery, Songdo,…


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  • Third Training Workshop of Youth Think Tank Competition for EAA Flyway is about Project Management

    3rd Training Workshop of Youth Think Tank Competition for EAA Flyway Project Management Objectives Project Management skills are essential to the effectiveness and increase the impact of the conservation effort. To better equip young people, especially future conservation leaders, the East Asian – Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) organized a series of training workshops, with the 3rd workshop focusing on project management. The two-day workshop will cover principles of the logical framework of project plan and fund-raising, as well as project evaluation and impact measurement. The trainer will lead on exercises and the use of tools. Date: 6th – 7th August, 2022 (Saturday and Sunday) In-depth Workshop – Day 1 “Logical Framework on project plan and Fund-raising” Date and Time: 6th August, 2022, 15:00 – 17:00 KST (2 hours) Quota: 30 people Livestream on EAAFP Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eaafp In-depth Workshop – Day 2 “Project Evaluation and Impact Measurement” Date and Time: 7th August, 2022, 15:00 – 17:00 KST (2 hours) Quota: 30 people Registration link: https://forms.gle/AJbpda5XL4389Ps29  Registration Deadline: 1st August 2022 Tool: Zoom Target Audience: Young conservationists, green groups for youth, local and international NGOs staffs, university students Eligibility for In-depth workshop: Aged 18-29 (under 30 on the date of application) Applicants with a nationality from EAA Flyway countries will be given priority to join Applicants to the EAAFP Youth Think Tank Competition will be given priority to join Important notice: We are using Zoom for the webinars and workshop. Please download the Zoom App (https://zoom.us/download) prior to the workshop. Successful applicants to the In-depth workshop will receive a separate email for the Zoom link and workshop rundown. It is a series of four workshops, only those who attend at least two In-depth workshops of the Youth Think Tank Competition Programme will receive a certificate of participation. Trainer Ms. Maaike Manten Trained as a political scientist in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Maaike started working for BirdLife International in the year 2000. Since then she has worked for BirdLife in the UK, Kenya, Fiji and Rwanda, first as the institutional fundraiser for Africa and the Pacific, and later as the Regional Implementation Team (RIT) leader for the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF)’s investment programmes in the Eastern Afromontane and the Mediterranean Basin biodiversity hotspots. Maaike has been working with CLP since 2009, providing project design, proposal writing and fundraising training to young conservationists in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. She is also the co-author of the ‘Institutional Fundraising for Conservation projects’ manual that is available in 5 languages here. She is currently based in Kigali, Rwanda, and working as a freelance fundraiser and trainer. Click [here] to learn more about Maaike. Supporting Organizations Topics of Upcoming Workshops: More information about the Youth Think Tank Competition for the EAA: https://www.eaaflyway.net/thinktankcompetition/ 4th Workshop: Conservation Communication and Story Telling (early September 2022) Playback of the previous workshops, click [here]. ( https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLVu-SI5onbMvPfamqQ5i84OpFx2CI6QaC)


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  • Announcement of EAAFP Partners Workshop leading up to MOP 11

    In preparation of and to increase dialogue with and between Partners in the months leading up to MOP11, which will be held in Brisbane Australia, from 12th – 17th March 2023, the Secretariat is organizing a series of webinars endorsed by the EAAFP Management Committee with the following schedule and program. The webinar series will give Partners the opportunity to be briefed on important ongoing activities of the Secretariat and follow-up on Decisions made at MOP10. The EAAFP Secretariat is inviting all Partners to mark these dates and participate in the webinars. Title: EAAFP Partners Workshop lead up to MOP 11 Date/Time: 1 – 5 August 2022; 15:00 – 17:30 KST Organizers: EAAFP Secretariat and Management Committee Participants: EAAFP Partners, EAAFP Working Groups and Task Forces, Flyway Network Site Managers Language: English Meeting Platform: Zoom Register: https://cutt.ly/dJJgCmV *We invite everyone to join as many sessions as possible EAAFP Provisional Programme Day Programme Presenter/Moderator Day 1 Opening Remarks Robb Kaler, MC Chair Briefing on MOP11 Doug Watkins, Secretariat Chief Executive/Nick Davidson, TsC Chair Activities of the Management Committee Robb Kaler, MC Chair Report on the Secretariat’s workplan and budget Doug Watkins, Secretariat Chief Executive Day 2 Presentation on the Partner New Reporting Template for MOP11 Doug Watkins, Secretariat Chief Executive Interactive Session 1: How to increase the effectiveness of Working Group/Task Forces for EAAFP, following up on the Discussion Paper presented at MoP10 (link). (TBC) Day 3 MOP10 DD08: EAAFP Guidelines for National and Site Partnerships (link) Jennifer George, Consultant MOP10 DD 09: EAAFP Guidelines for the Sister Site Program (link) Day 4 Presentation on the revised CEPA Action Plan 2023 – 2028 Casey Burns, CEPA Working Group Chair Update on the ADB Regional Flyway Initiative Duncan Lang, Asian Development Bank /Doug Watkins, Secretariat Chief Executive /Ding Li, BirdLife International Day 5 Conservation Status Review of Migratory Waterbird Populations for the EAAFP [MOP10 DD 12] / Q&A Taej Mundkur, Consultant to Wetlands International Interactive Session 2: How to expand, strengthen and engage the Flyway Site Network, including adopting a more simplified and focused nomination form (SIS)  Nick Davidson, TsC Chair/Qing Zeng, Science Officer Closing Remarks Robb Kaler, MC Chair For inquiries, please email to secretariat@eaaflyway.net.


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  • New Publication “ China Wetland Centers Manual for Planning and Practice” by Mangrove Foundation

    By 2021, China has 64 wetlands of International Importance, 20 Flyway Network Sites, 602 Wetland Nature Reserves, 899…


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  • Join 2022 “Year of the Terns” Photo Contest

      English Simplified Chinese Traditional Chinese Japanese Korean Indonesian Official Photo Contest website: https://woobox.com/dsmyac Photo Contest Guidelines PDF: English / Bahasa Indonesia / Chinese [Simplified / Traditional] / Japanese/ Korean For more in Japanese, visit the Wild Bird Society of Japan (WBSJ) website: https://www.wbsj.org/activity/event/terns-photocontest-2022/ Learn more about the "Year of the Terns" campaign, click here. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//woobox.com/js/plugins/woo.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'woobox-sdk')); Photo Contest Judges


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2022 calls for reducing Light Pollution for migratory birds

    “Light Pollution” is this year’s theme of World Migratory Bird Day, an UN-backed celebrated awareness-raising campaign aiming to inspire the worldwide conservation of both migratory birds and their habitats. With the official slogan “Dim the Lights for Birds at Night!”, this global campaign focus on the impacts of light pollution on migratory birds. Our Earth continues to become brighter by 2% each year, light pollution has become an increasing problem for nature. A study told us that nowadays, more than 80% of the world's population lives under a “lit sky”. Humans are negatively affected by light pollution, with increasing risks of sleep disorders, diabetes, depression and other health problems. Light Pollution is also significantly impacting wildlife and ecosystems Every year, light pollution contributes to the death of millions of birds, especially the nocturnal migrant. It also interferes with birds’ internal clocks, vocal communication, foraging behaviors and disrupts migrations. Many studies showed that artificial lights at night (ALAN) attract and disorient birds flying at night, causing them to circle in illuminated areas, depleting their energy reserves and putting them at risk of exhaustion, predation and lethal collision. Seabirds are vulnerable to artificial Light at night, in East Asian-Australasian Flyway, a 15-year study showed light pollution caused the mortality of 39% of Short-tailed Shearwater fledglings on Phillip Island, Australia. The effects of light pollution on migratory birds unfortunately have not been extensively studied and discussed in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, yet the campaign this year shed light to generate awareness from the public as well as encourage studies and concrete actions from key stakeholders to address it. Solutions are Readily Available People started to realize the problem and solutions to address the impacts of light pollution are readily available. For example, the Australian Government (EAAFP Partner) proposed Resolution 13.5 “Light Pollution Guidelines for Wildlife” which was adopted during the 13th Conference of the Parties to CMS in 2020. Numerous governments, cities, companies, and communities around the world are already taking steps to address light pollution. New guidelines focusing on migratory landbirds and bats are currently being developed under CMS. They will be presented to CMS Parties for adoption at the 14th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to CMS in 2023. Natural darkness has conservation value in the same way as clean water, air, and soil, and should be protected. World Migratory Bird Day 2022 – Animated Promo Video About World Migratory Bird Day Launched in 2006, WMBD was established and initiated by the Secretariat of the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (UNEP-AEWA) in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), and partnered with Environment for the Americas (EFTA) since 2017. WMBD is now celebrated twice every year, on the 2nd Saturday in May and October. People around the world take action and organize public events such as bird festivals, educational and promotional programmes and birdwatching excursions to celebrate WMBD. Official website: https://www.worldmigratorybirdday.org/ Read also: The Australian Government: National Light Pollution Guidelines for Wildlife Including Marine Turtles, Seabirds and Migratory Shorebirds, and a series of promotional materials, click hereto find out more. Global Press release on WMBD: https://www.worldmigratorybirdday.org/news/2022/press-release-world-migratory-bird-day-light-pollution-threatens-birds-across-world Resources: 2022 WMBD 2022 Campaign Strategy: https://www.cms.int/sites/default/files/publication/wmbd_2022_campaign_strategy_light_pollution.pdf WMBD global social media package: https://trello.com/b/GCeoS3bc/world-migratory-bird-day-2022-global-social-media-pack EAAFP 2022 WMBD website, posters and resources: https://www.eaaflyway.net/world-migratory-bird-day-2022/ EAAFP 2022 WMBD Factsheet


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  • Second Training Workshop of Youth Think Tank Competition for EAA Flyway is about Local Community Engagement

    2nd training Workshop of Youth Think Tank Competition for EAA Flyway - Understanding Nature-based Solutions and local community engagement in conservation of migratory waterbirds and wetlands During the 1st EAA Flyway Think Tank Competition Workshop last year, we gained insight into the high level of interest that youth participants had in environmental issues, especially wetlands and migratory waterbirds. Many participants showed their eagerness to learn more about conservation and how they can engage in the implementation of local actions to decision-making. To better equip young people, especially future young professionals to take part in the conservation of migratory waterbirds, their habitats, and local communities relying on the wetlands, the EAAFP Secretariat is pleased to organize a 2nd training workshop with a focus on local community engagement. Objectives: To introduce the concept of Nature-based Solutions as a tool that links local community engagement and conservation To enhance knowledge and skills on local community engagement for conservation projects Date: 28th – 29th May, 2022 (Saturday and Sunday) Part 1. Open webinar  “Understanding Nature-based Solutions and local community engagement in conservation of migratory waterbirds and wetlands” Date and time:28th May, 2022, 1500-1600 KST (1 hour) Registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUkfuipqDIrHdF_cnd72-FUQOP4ZMRFt8KZ Livestream on EAAFP Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/eaafp Part 2. In-depth workshop “Engaging Local Community in conservation of migratory waterbirds and wetlands” Date and time:28th & 29th May, 2022, 1700-1900 KST (2 hours/day) Quota: 30 people Registration: :  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSebISr3L5X2u0cbNI5Q0LOPzvWX4AcOlwxx00P1BV9a6-_lgw/viewform Deadline of registration: 13th May, 2022 Tool: Zoom Target Audience: Young conservationists, green youth groups., local and international NGOs young staffs, university students Eligibility for In-depth workshop: Aged 18-29(under 30 on the date of application) Applicants with a nationality from EAA Flyway countries will be given priority to join Applicants to the EAAFP Youth Think Tank Competition will be given priority to join Important notice We are using Zoom for the webinars and workshop. Please download the Zoom App (https://zoom.us/download) prior to the workshop. Successful applicants to the In-depth workshop will receive a separate email for the Zoom link and workshop rundown. It is a series of four workshops, only those who attend at least two In-depth workshops of the Youth Think Tank Competition Programme will receive a certificate of participation. Programme   Part 1 Webinar – "Understanding Nature-based Solutions and local community engagement in conservation to migratory waterbirds and wetlands" Keynote speakers   Ms. Kathryn Bimson Programme Officer, Water, Wetlands and Nature-based Solutions for Climate at the IUCN Asia Regional Office. Ms. Kathryn Bimson has been working on wetlands in Southeast Asia for the last nine years, and is currently coordinating the regional implementation of a number of projects related to Nature-based Solutions and wetlands in the Lower Mekong Basin. Ms. Bimson also supports the Secretariat for the Indo-Burma Ramsar Regional Initiative, working closely with the governments of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Viet Nam to strengthen the implementation of the Ramsar Convention in the region. Ms. Bimson holds an MSc. in Biology from the Prince of Songkla University, Thailand, and a BSc. in Biology from Fairfield University, USA. She previously received a National Geographic Young Explorer’s Grant to study private sector engagement in coral reef restoration, and spent her first year in Thailand as an English Teaching Assistant with the US Fulbright Program.   Mr. Jiefeng Jin Yangtze Basin Program Manager, China Programme, International Crane Foundation (ICF) Mr. Jiefeng Jin started his conservation career in 2009 and joined ICF in 2014. To conserve the Critically Endangered species Siberian Crane and other three crane species as well as their wetland habitats, he maintains and develops good relationships with various partners, donors and other stakeholders, designs and implements ICF conservation strategies in wintering area of Yangtze River Basin, particularly in Poyang Lake where over 98% of the world population of Siberian Crane together with almost all of the western population of White-naped Crane are wintering. He works closely with national and international research institutes to advise on management actions for protecting cranes and other waterbirds. He is committed to promoting public awareness and engagement, such as recruiting and training volunteers from local communities and colleges to carry out education and outreach for the public. He has a deep interest in working with local communities to safeguard their resource base while restoring landscapes important to cranes. He obtained his second M.S. degree in Environmental Conservation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2020. Part 2 In-depth workshop “Engaging Local Community in conservation of migratory waterbirds and wetlands”   Key Trainer Ms. Mercy Kariuki Programme Officer, BirdLife International Ms. Mercy Kariuki is a Kenyan conservationist with an interest in community conservation work especially in Africa and is a recent graduate of MPhil in Conservation Leadership from the University of Cambridge. She has worked for BirdLife International (both in Nairobi & currently in Cambridge office) for about 10 years in various capacities & positions. Through the BirdLife Local Engagement and Empowerment Programme, Mercy has worked with BirdLife Partners supporting community-led conservation initiatives, developing community conservation projects/proposals, managing projects, meeting local communities to conduct capacity assessments among other activities that involve community engagement. Mercy enjoys outdoor activities such as birdwatching, hiking and mountain climbing. Case Study Speakers for In-depth Workshop Mr. George Ndung’u Muigai Founder, Cranes Conservation Volunteers Prof. Wataru Kitamura Associate Professor, Department of Restoration Ecology and Built Environment, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Tokyo City University Ms. Amy Lecciones Executive Director, Society for the Conservation of Philippine Wetlands, Inc. Mr. Johnson Chung Project Manager, Hong Kong Bird Watching Society     Supporting organizations: Topics of upcoming workshops: 3rd workshop: Project management, evaluation and impact assessment, and fund-raising (6-7, August, 2022) 4th workshop: Communication (story-telling and scientific communication) and project evaluation, impact measurement (September, 2022) More information about the Youth Think Tank Competition for the EAA:https://www.eaaflyway.net/thinktankcompetition/ Playback of the workshop: https://www.eaaflyway.net/2022/06/10/eaaf-youth-think-tank-2nd-workshop/  


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  • Development Workshop in Ro Korea on the proposed Wetland Education Ramsar Resolution

    On 19th November, 2021, the “Wetland Education Resolution Development for Ramsar COP14 Workshop” was held in Gyeonsangnamdo…


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  • World Albatross Day 2021 “Ensuring Albatross-friendly Fisheries”

    Today is the World Albatross Day (WAD)! It was launched in 2020 by the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) to dedicate 19th June every year to raise awareness of the conservation needs of albatrosses, petrels, and shearwaters. Many of them are being killed as a result of fisheries operations and other human-induced threats. This year, the theme for WAD2021 is “Ensuring Albatross-Friendly Fisheries”, to highlight the problems of populations of albatrosses, and other seabirds that are declining due to fisheries bycatch. Words from Mr. Robert (Robb) Kaler, Chair of EAAFP and Chair of EAAFP Seabird Working Group “This year’s theme of World Albatross Day “Ensuring Albatross-Friendly Fisheries” reminds us of the impact that human brought to, not only Albatrosses but many seabird species. Fishery bycatch is one of the main threats to the decline of seabirds worldwide. Scientists, government agencies, and the fishing industry sector are now implementing mitigation, in which some of them are simple to apply. In the EAA Flyway, studies about seabirds are very limited. World Albatross Day is a great opportunity to raise the awareness on seabird conservation, and highlight the importance of reducing impacts of the world’s fisheries on seabirds and other non-targeted species.” The problems of fisheries threatening albatrosses and other seabirds Many seabird species, especially Albatrosses, spend most of their lives soaring in open seas, except during the breeding time when they return to land to nest. Yet staying far from land does not stop seabirds from being impacted by human activities. In fact, nearly half of the world's seabird populations are declining, especially Albatrosses, with 15 of 22 species are threatened with extinction. Albatrosses feed mainly on fish and squid on the ocean’s surface. They can smell their prey from a far (up to 20 km away!). This extraordinary ability, however, exposes them to danger, for they are attracted to fishing vessels which use baited hooks in the longline fishery and can get caught and drown. An estimated 160,000 to 320,000 seabirds are killed annually in longline fisheries1. Trawl, purse seine, and gillnet fisheries are other gear types also have seabird bycatch issues. At least 400,000 seabirds (especially diving species) are estimated to be killed annually in gillnet fisheires globally2. According to a global assessment of threats to seabirds, the three primary threats are: (i) invasive species impacting 165 species, (ii) bycatch in fisheries affecting 100 species, and (iii) climate change affecting 96 species3. Albatrosses and petrels killed by bycatch in fishery ©Fabiano Peppes   Conservation work in the EAA Flyway Scientists around the world are working on solutions to reduce seabird bycatch. Some of these methods are: bird-scaring lines (also called tori lines) with colorful streamers attached to lines to keep birds away, fishing at night to reduce interactions between birds and fishing activities, and adding weights to increase the sinking speed of baited hooks. Source: Birdlife International (2021) Towards Seabird-safe Fisheries - Global Efforts & Solutions   In the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, especially in the Asian region, research on seabirds is rather limited, let alone the study on the impact of fisheries on seabirds. Yet, there is work by BirdLife International and Wild Bird Society of Japan (both EAAFP Partners), which developed a nationwide-scale hotspot map of seabird bycatch in gillnet fisheries in Japan (read [more]). Another project to evaluate mitigation ideas of seabird bycatch in gillnet under a controlled condition is ongoing, and data collection of seabird bycatch in gillnet fisheries in collaboration with local fishers is about to begin. Know about the three species of Albatrosses in EAAFlyway Laysan Albatross ©Simba Chan Laysan Albatross, Phoebastria immutabilis, is a large seabird (length: 79-81 cm) with white head with dark gray-brown upper wings. It is the most common albatross in open Pacific Ocean. The species is listed as Near Threatened (NT) by IUCN. Main threats in breeding sites are the invasion of rats and feral cats. Conservation or eradication of Polynesian rats had been successfully managed. The famous oldest known wild bird in the world Wisdom, still raising a chick at age 70, is of this species.   Black-footed Albatross at Ogasawara Island ©Tomohiro Deguchi Black-footed Albatross, Phoebastria nigripes, (length: 68-74cm) has long, narrow wings and mostly dark except for a white ring around its long, thick bill. It breeds on oceanic islands across the tropical and subtropical North Pacific Ocean and adults concentrate on nesting islands in Izu and Ogasawara Islands of Japan and on Senkaku Islands. The species is listed as Near Threatened (NT) by IUCN because it is taken incidentally by longline fishery. Main threats used to be feral cats on Northwestern Hawaiian Islands where the eradication has been taken effectively. Short-tailed Albatross ©Lee Kwok Shing Short-tailed Albatross, Phoebastira albatrus is a large pelagic bird (length:84-94 cm) with long narrow wings adapted for soaring just above the water surface. It spends most of its life over northern Pacific Ocean and breeds on islands off Japan and more recently, Midway Atoll. Its population is estimated to be 7,365 birds and listed as Vulnerable (VU) by IUCN. Erosion, flooding, and high winds (blow chicks off their nests) at Tsubame-zaki colony, and black rats on Torishima remain as threats to the bird despite habitat management efforts that have been undertaken.   Join the World Albatross Day activities: Follow the Albatross Task Force on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/albatross_stories/), join the Albatross World Cup, take the Friday Quiz, see how much you know about Albatrosses in the world. Check also their Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/Albytaskforce/) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/AlbyTaskForce) World Albatross Day events in Japan (in Japanese): 世界アルバトロスデー Join the quiz from EAAFP about the World Albatross Day, click [here]!   https://www.eaaflyway.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/WAD-video_final.mp4   References: Anderson, al. 2011. Global seabird bycatch in longline fisheries. Endang. Species Res. 14, 91–106 (http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/esr/v14/n2/p91-106/) Žydelis, al. 2013. The incidental catch of seabirds in gillnet fisheries: A global review. Biological Conservation. 162: 76-88. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.04.002) Dias al. 2019. Threats to seabirds: A global assessment. Biological Conservation. 237: 525-537 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2019.06.033) Birdlife International (2021) Towards Seabird-safe Fisheries - Global Efforts & Solutions.


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