• Record-breaking 10 million points for seabird conservation

    8 June 2017 Maria Dias, BirdLife International Today we celebrate World Oceans Day as we finally reach 10 million – not dollars, pounds or euros –…


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2017 – National celebration and site managers’ workshop in Seocheon, Republic of Korea

    Minjae Baek, Intern, EAAFP Secretariat The national celebration of International Day for Biological Diversity, World Wetland Day and World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) 2017 was…


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  • Red Knots Are Battling Climate Change—On Both Ends of the Earth

    The tiny, threatened bird is an omen for how devastating ocean acidification can be. By Deborah Cramer for Audubon magazine…


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  • This Korean recipe could save Piper

    On the west coast of the Republic of Korea, there is a precious mudflat remaining in a sea of coastal concrete. Following a BirdLife team visit with a nature-tourism…


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  • Symposium: Impacts of Wind Farms on Migratory Birds

    ? Countermeasures for barrier effects and collision with migratory birds - ©Wild Bird Society of Japan Wind power generation has been introduced in many countries in the world as a source of efficient renewable electricity. However, wind farms can cause the collisions with birds and habitat loss for migratory waterbirds. In the symposium, advanced overseas cases are shared to learn how biodiversity conservation and energy supply shift to natural energy can be achieved together. Date: Sunday, 11 December 2016 Time: 13:00-17:30 (Registration starts at 12:30) Venue: North Hall, Keio University Mita Campus Access map: https://www.keio.ac.jp/ja/maps/mita.html Number of seats: 100 seats Registration: E-mail to sympo2016@wbsj.org *Please include 1. Your name, 2. Affiliation, and 3. Title of the symposium. Simultaneous interpretation between Japanese and English is available. Organizer: Wild Bird Society of Japan and BirdLife International Tokyo Program 1. Introduction Impacts of wind farm on birds and issues with EIA 2. Key note lecture -1?Dr. Aonghais Cook (British Trust for Ornithology) Impacts of wind farm on birds – Effects on migratory birds. 3. Key note lecture -2?Dr. Tristram Allinson (BirdLife International) Sensitivity map as countermeasure for avoid the impacts to migratory birds 4. Panel discussion   Summary of lecture Key note lecture-1?Dr. Aonghais Cook (British Trust for Ornithology) In this presentation, I review the existing evidence base on barrier effects in relation to both onshore and offshore wind farms. I consider the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies which have been used and how the impact of barrier effects may vary between different species or species groups. I highlight those species or species groups which may be particularly sensitive to barrier effects and discuss potential approaches with which to mitigate these impacts. Key note lecture-2?Tristram Allinson (BirdLife International) In this presentation, I review how such tools can be used to assess wind farm impacts, including from barrier effects, in order to ensure that wind farms are not sited in locations where they will have a detrimental impact on soaring bird species.   Japanese source: シンポジウム・風力発電が渡り鳥に与える影響を考える‐障壁影響、バードストライク等への対応


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  • Economic valuation of ecosystem services provided by wetlands

    Kaori Tsujita, Ministry of the Environment, Japan Ecosystem services are the benefits that people receive from nature and we…


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  • New Agreement for the Conservation of the Republic of Korea’s Top Coastal Wetland

    Read in Korean By Mike Crosby, BirdLife International


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  • Brave efforts pay off in doubly-successful project to restore colonies of Chinese Crested Tern

    Read in Japanese Written By Shaun Hurrell (BirdLife International)


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  • First hand-reared spoon-billed sandpiper returns to breed

    Posted on: June 25, 2014 Report by Saving the Spoon-billed Sandpiper   The first hand-reared spoon-billed sandpiper has returned to breed in Chukotka, Russia, where it was hatched…


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