• Updates on Avian Influenza Situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Sep 2023 – Dec 2023)

    The following article is based on a summary provided by Kamata Akiko from the FAO Animal Production and Health division (NSAH): FAO/EMPRES-AH consistently monitors the global avian influenza situation, gathering information from various national and international sources and peer-reviewed scientific articles. Through close collaboration with country and regional offices, the implementation of avian influenza field surveillance projects, and networks of expertise such as WOAH/FAO’s OFFLU (www.offlu.org), timely information on outbreaks, surveillance findings, and genetic similarities of circulating viruses or their virological features is made accessible. This information is stored in the EMPRES Global Animal Disease Information System (EMPRES-i), a database available online at https://empres-i.apps.fao.org/. Between September 3 and December 2, 2023, three distinct subtypes of avian influenza virus were reported in East and South-East Asia. Among these, only H5N1 or H5 were confirmed to be highly pathogenic in poultry. ©EMPRES-I In September, India reported one H5N1 HPAI event in Black Swans and Silver pheasants in a national park in Maharashtra State. The Republic of Korea reported 39 LPAI events in 8 out of 17 provinces, including 35 H5N3 LPAI, one H5N2 LPAI, and two H5 LPAI events in captured or dead wild birds and their droppings — and since November 27, three H5N1 HPAI events in captured or dead wild birds in North Jeolla and North Gyeongsang provinces, and one H5N1 HPAI outbreak on a duck farm in South Jeolla Province. Since October 4, Japan reported 52 events of H5N1 HPAI in 13 out of 47 prefectures among various bird species (e.g., Anatidae, eastern buzzard, eastern spot-billed duck, Eurasian teal, Eurasian wigeon, hooded crane, large-billed crow, mountain hawk-eagle, peregrine falcon, red-crowned crane, Tundra swan, whooper swan, a captive falcon, and its prey) and environmental samples, including water samples from the Izumi Wintering Habitat of Cranes. Since November 24, four H5N1 HPAI outbreaks in layer chickens in four prefectures. China reported one detection of H5N1 HPAI in environmental samples collected from Sihcao Wetland in Tainan City on November 18, along with five outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI in poultry in Tainan City, Chiayi, Miaoli, Yunlin counties, and one detection at a slaughterhouse in Taipei City in Taiwan Province. Indonesia reported an unspecified subtype of HPAI outbreak during September-October. Viet Nam officially reported HPAI outbreaks in domestic birds in Binh Duong, Long An, and Quang Nam provinces, also detecting H5N1 in two markets in Nghe An Province. In Cambodia, a total of four H5N1 HPAI outbreaks in village poultry were reported in Prey Veng and Svay Rieng provinces in October, and in Kampot Province in November. Meanwhile, three cases of human infection with influenza A(H5N1) virus were reported from Cambodia in Prey Veng and Svay Rieng provinces in October and Kampot Province in November. China also reported one case of A(H5N6) in Chongqing in September and one case of A(H9N2) in Sichuan in October. Highly pathogenic H5Nx viruses have demonstrated the ability to spread via migratory water birds. During this period, H5N1 HPAI events have also been reported in wild birds near Antarctica, namely among brown skua in South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, and southern fulmar and black-browed albatross in the Falkland Islands (Malvinas). We consider avian influenza activity in the East Asia flyway area to have increased during this period, so reports of outbreaks in poultry and detections in wild birds and some mammal species are expected to increase over the coming months in the region. The list of bird species affected by H5Nx HPAI globally is available HERE with the new species reported since 2021 highlighted in orange.


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  • Updates of Worldwide Avian Influenza Situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Dec 2022 – June 2023)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. In close collaboration with country and regional offices, the implementation of avian influenza field surveillance projects, and networks of expertise like WOAH/FAO’s OFFLU (www.offlu.org) provide access to timely information on outbreaks, surveillance findings, and genetic similarities of circulating viruses or their virological features. This information is stored in the EMPRES Global Animal Disease Information System (EMPRES-i), a database that can be accessed online at https://empres-i.apps.fao.org/. Avian Influenza in East and Southeast Asia from December 2022 to June 2023 ©EMPRES-I During the period of 3 December to 2 June 2023, six highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtypes (H5, H5N1, H5N2, H5N5, H5N6, and H5N8) and five low pathogenic avian influenzas (LPAI) virus subtypes (H3N8, H5N2, H7N7, H7N3, and H9N2) have been reported detected in Eastern and South-eastern Asia. H5Nx HPAI viruses continue to circulate in Eastern and South-eastern Asia and reported detections increased since the last report. Within the reporting period, HPAI outbreaks occurred in Cambodia which reported an H5N1 detection in an unspecified wild bird in Prey Veng province caused by the clade 2.3.2.1c. Japan reported HPAI H5, H5N1, and H5N8 affecting numerous species of captive and wild birds including Crane, Crow, Swan, Goshawk, Mallard, Flacon, Eagle, Heron, Buzzard, Owl, Spoonbill, Scaup, Goose, Duck, and Jay as well as outbreaks in poultry caused by H5N1 and H5N2 subtypes leading to the culling of over 14 million birds in 32 provinces. In the Republic of Korea, there were reports of 70 H5N1 outbreaks of clade 2.3.4.4b which affected nearly 4 million domestic poultry in the regions of Chollanam-do, Chungcheongnam-do, Chungchongbuk-do, Gangwon-do, Gyeonggi-do, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Jeollabuk-do, Jeollanam-do, Kyongsangnam-do, Kyonggi-do and Kyongsangbuk-do. Indonesia reported one poultry outbreak caused by the H5N1 clade 2.3.4.4b in Kalimantan Selatan affecting 4430 ducks. Clade 2.3.2.1e viruses have been detected in West Java, Central Java, and Lampung Riau provinces. Viet Nam officially reported nine poultry outbreaks in Cao Bang, Dong Nam, Nghe An, Ninh Binh Quand Ngai, and Quang Ninh provinces affecting 4192 out of 4200 ducks and unspecified birds In China, Taiwan Province reported 66 poultry outbreaks caused by H5Nx, H5N1, H5N2, and H5N5 subtypes that lead to the destruction of over 1 million domestic poultry. Wild birds were affected by the H5, H5N1 subtypes affecting Eurasian teal, Black-faced spoonbill, Gull-billed tern, and Whiskered terns. One H5N1 HPAI detection was reported in Hong Kong SAR, China in Black-faced spoonbill. Outbreaks in poultry caused by low pathogenic subtypes included H9N2 reported in Taiwan, the Province of China, and the H7N7 and H7N3 low pathogenic subtypes were detected in environmental samples.   In addition to outbreaks in avian species: A(H5N1) was reported in a fox in Japan in April 2023. In the last update, Viet Nam reported one influenza A(H5) human infection in a 5-year-old female who had exposure to backyard poultry and ducks; the subtype has now been confirmed as A(H5N1). Since the last update A(H3N8) has been reported in Guangdong Provence in China in a 56-year-old female and A(H5N6) in a 49-year-old male. Two clades 2.3.2.1c A(H5N1) cases were reported in Cambodia in an 11-year-old girl (fatal) and her father (mild illness). In Anhui province, one clade 2.3.4.4b A(H5N1) human infection was reported in a 53-year-old female. 5 human cases of A(H9N2) were reported in children in the Hunan (3), Jiangxi (1) and Sichuan (1) provinces. Most of these cases reported exposure to backyard poultry and any human-to-human transmission has been ruled out. Since 2014 (as of 3 June 2023), there have been 83 human cases of influenza A(H5N6) have been reported, 82 occurring in China and one in Lao People's Democratic Republic with the most recent case reported on 2 February 2023 with an onset of disease on 17 December 2022 in China. Both the clade 2.3.2.1c and the clade 2.3.4.4b A(H5N1) have caused disease in humans since 2020. The most recent reports of each had an onset of 23 February 2023 and 31 January 2023 respectively. To date 116 influenza A(H9N2) human cases have been reported worldwide with at least 96 cases reported in China since December 2015. The most recent case was reported on 9 March 2023 with an onset date of 5 February 2023 in China. Highly pathogenic Goose/Guangdong lineage clade 2.3.4.4b H5Nx viruses have demonstrated the ability to spread long distances via migratory water birds. These viruses are continuing to infect an increasing range of wild bird species. This has led to an increase in infections reported in mammalian species which often display neurological symptoms. Globally the impacts on ecologically important birds, such as seabirds have been increasingly noted and are implicated in spread. Asia has experienced repeated incursions of the virus from multiple directions as well as circulation. We expect avian influenza activity to maintain in Asia. Reports of outbreaks in poultry, detections in wild birds and occasional detections in mammalian species are expected to continue in the region over the coming months. Please click [here] to view a larger version of the table above


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  • Updates of Worldwide Avian Influenza Situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Sept 2022 – Dec 2022)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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  • Updates of Worldwide Avian Influenza Situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Jun 2022 – Sept 2022)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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  • Updates of worldwide Avian Influenza situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Mar 2022 – Jun 2022)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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  • Updates of worldwide avian influenza situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Dec 2021 – Mar 2022)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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  • Updates of worldwide avian influenza situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (June-Sept 2021)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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  • Updates of worldwide avian influenza situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Feb-June 2021)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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  • Updates of worldwide avian influenza situation by FAO/EMPRES-AH (Dec-Feb 2021)

    FAO/EMPRES-AH is constantly monitoring the avian influenza situation worldwide and compiles information from multiple national and international sources as well as peer-reviewed scientific articles. Close collaboration with country and…


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