• Implementing collaborative waterbirds conservation in the RO Korea and EAAF, 2018

    Group Photo (c)Minshil Lee/EAAFP   On 13 September 2018, a workshop titled “Implementing collaborative waterbird conservation in the Republic of Korea and the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF)” was held at G-tower, Songdo, RO Korea, which was co-organized by BirdLife International, BirdLife Australia and EAAFP Secretariat.  The EAAF is the most threatened flyway in the world, playing host to 32 threatened species of migratory waterbirds. Increased collaborative efforts throughout the flyway are seeking to mitigate ongoing threats and ameliorate habitat loss and degradation. This workshop was to investigate opportunities to share habitat management strategies, facilitate standardised monitoring methods and increase national and international recognition of important waterbird areas in ROK.  About 20 people from National Institutes, NGOs, professors and relevant parties participated in the workshop. There are three sessions consisting of the importance of secure roost sites for the conservation of migratory shorebirds, standardisation of waterbird monitoring and Introduction of Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) and Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs). Dr. Lew Young, Chief Executive of EAAFP, took a lead on the first session by delivering a speech on global importance of EAAF for conserving migratory birds. The major theme of first session was how to secure and optimize roosts by conserving existing roosts and building new one in ROK, especially in Seocheon where the Geum Project was implemented. “As most of the habitats of birds have been lost, they are increasingly aerial roosting, wasting energy.” said Dr. Chris Purnell, Birdlife Australia and he proposed floating shorebird roosts trial in ROK as a one way of preventing loss of their habitats.   In the second session, Dr. Youngmin Moon, Coordinator of BirdLife International and Mr. Hong-Tae Jeonof Culture and Tourism Team in Seocheon County Government introduced the current status of waterbirds monitoring system and schemes in ROK and Seocheon. By comparing the well-structed databased system for waterbirds counting in Australia, during the discussion session, many of participants raised the issue to develop a similar application and webpage to check the population of waterbirds and their migration lead by the government, together with NGOs.  As a last session, the concept of IBAs and KBAs and importance of the expansion the Areas were presented by Mr. Mike Crosby, Birdlife International. Currently, in ROK, 33 IBAs were designated, but participants assumed more than 100 IBAs could be considered as of now.   Various existing problems in ROK were raised with an emphasis on the national-wide cooperation between stakeholders to conserve migratory waterbirds and biodiversity.


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  • Welcomes New Communication Officer!

    The EAAFP Secretariat is very pleased to announce that Ms. Vivian Fu from Hong Kong has joined on 27 September 2018 as a new EAAFP Communication Officer, replacing Ms….


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  • 10th Australasian Ornithological Conference (AOC), Darwin, Australia, 2019

    The 10th Australasian Ornithological Conference (AOC) will be held in Darwin, Northern Territory from 3-5th July 2019. The AOC is the primary conference for BirdLife Australia And Birds NZ,…


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  • A tribute to Jim Harris

    EAAFP has been lucky to have many committed individuals share their valuable…


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  • Interview with KyeungIn Daily News

    On 10 September 2018, a reporter of the KyeungIn Daily News (a local newspaper) visited our office and had an interview with Dr. Lew Young,…


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  • “Great Flight of Shorebirds” Symposium, Hwaseong, RO Korea, 6 Sep 2018

    On the occasion of World Shorebird Day 2018, an international symposium is being held in Hwaseong City (RO Korea) to highlight the importance of the Hwaseong tidal-flats for coastal…


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  • Uijeongbu DMZ International Forum

    On 6 September 2018, DMZ International Forum entitled ‘Connecting People and Nature for Peace Ecosystem Conservation and Sustainable Development in DMZ areas’ co-organized by Gyeonggi Province and Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) was held at Uijeongbu Arts Center in the Republic of Korea. In the discussion session, Dr. Lew Young, Chief Executive of EAAFP, mentioned that the DMZ is an important stopping-over area for migratory birds such as cranes while the small off-shore rocky islands are important places for breeding Chinese Egrets and Black-faced Spoonbills. He said, “to designate protected areas in the DMZ, we need to work with the local community and ensure that they also receive benefits from the designation.” At the forum, a few organizations were invited to promote their organization’s mission and activities that are related to Ecosystem Conservation and Sustainable Development in DMZ areas. The EAAFP Secretariat had a short briefing to introduce the Partnership, and the work of EAAFP to conserve migratory waterbirds and habitats. The participants were able to learn about key bird species in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, Flyway Site Network, Yellow Sea Conservation, and the Partnership’s cooperation with DPRK who recently joined the Partnership in April 2018. Photos by EAAFP Secretariat


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  • Farewell to IT Intern Banseok

    Written by Banseok Koo What I learned during my internship at EAAFP is how to communicate within the office and people outside the office. First is how to communicate within the office. When I was overwhelmed with tasks, I merely thought I should reply to task requesting emails when I am done with the task. However, even though I am not complete, I realized It is better to report my honest situation rather than making my supervisors wait for my reply. I learned it better to say no than to say nothing. It is important for a supervisor to keep track of their requested task and they understand my situation. I shouldn’t be afraid of explaining my situation of not being able to complete the task. It is one of the valuable lessons to take from EAAFP that my supervisors let me know. Figure 1 WMBD Reception EAAFP lovely staff group photo I also learned to communicate with people outside our office. I fortunately had a chance to be in a critical position when making a contract with IT companies while changing a service provider. The process was complicated and caused some delay than our expected timeline. During the process, I learned from my supervisors how to communicate with people without unnecessary conflict while getting things done. First, it is wise to ask for the exact deadline. It gives people a motivation and we can legitimately complain about the past deadline if the work is not done by the deadline. It is also important to ask for a written form of promise after a verbal talk. So, I always asked for an email to be written to me summarizing the promise the company made after a phone call. That way, I could track process and use the email as a verification for complaint when the promise was not kept. Figure 2 Field Trip to Seocheon for the International Biodiversity Day Event There were uncountable lessons that I learned during my 5-month internship which I didn’t mention but communication within and outside the office was the most memorable and valuable ones. I really thank everyone in my office to let me grow as a more effective worker. Photos credit to EAAFP Secretariat


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