• Relevant Scientific Articles updated in Apr 2015

    If you need full scientific articles, please contact Dr Judit Szabo, the science officer.   ANATIDAE Fox, A. D., K. Kuhlmann Clausen, L. Dalby, T. K. Christensen, and P. Sunde. 2015. Age-ratio bias among hunter-based surveys of Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope based on wing vs. field samples. Ibis 157:391–395.   CRANES Khan, A., P. Chandan, […]

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  • Spoon-billed Sandpiper Task Force: News Bulletin No.13, February 2015

    The 13th Spoon-billed Sandpiper Task Force (SBS TF) News Bulletin is downloadable here. The contents are as below. To read previous news bulletins and find out more about Spoon-billed Sandpiper, please visit our SBS TF page. Foreword from the Editor Russkaya Koshka expedition June 2014 – first positive trends in the breeding grounds Ringing SBS at stopover […]

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  • Myanmar Conservation Group Protects Endangered Bird Species

    Author: Logan Linnane   As the level of human and infrastructural development in Myanmar continually climbs, the status of the republic’s wildlife looks bleak more than ever. The Spoon-Billed Sandpiper is one of the world’s most Critically Endangered birds, with a population falling below 500 members. While the drop in population couldn’t be any more […]

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  • Singapore Intertidal Zone Conservation Symposium

    A two-day Symposium on Intertidal Conservation in Southeast Asia was held at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve (SBWR) in Singapore on 12-13 June 2014, co-hosted by BirdLife International, the National Parks Board, the National University of Singapore’s Asia Pacific Centre for Environmental Law (APCEL/NUS), and the Nature Society of Singapore. The Symposium aimed to raise awareness […]

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  • Spoon-billed Sandpipers Winter 2013-2014

    Author: Philip D. Round Report by Bird Conservation Society of Thailand The following is a round-up of the Winter events from the Bird Conservation Society of Thailand: “This was an eventful winter in the precarious history of the declining population of Spoon-billed Sandpipers. An International Workshop, hosted by BCST, was held at the Ban Khung Nam […]

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  • Making The Welcome Warmer

    Posted on: January 22, 2014 Author: Amorn Liukeeratiyutkul, Gawin Chutima & Philip D. Round Report by Bangkok Post   Greater efforts will be needed, both at home and abroad, to prevent the extinction of a plucky little bird which breeds in Russia and then makes a marathon annual migration to Southeast Asia   Does it […]

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  • Spoon-billed sandpiper – they’re back! The first spoonie seen at Sonadia Island

    Earlier this year, Sonadia Island was declared an Important Bird Area (IBA) due to its importance for shorebirds, especially the Critically Endangered spoon-billed sandpiper (Sonadia Island is the most important site in Bangladesh for this highly threatened species). The Bangladesh Spoon-billed Sandpiper Conservation Project (BSCP, see their Facebook page) is supported by the RSPB through […]

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  • Spoon-billed sandpiper numbers boosted by conservationists

    Critically endangered spoon-billed sandpipers fledglings have increased in number by a quarter in 2013, after conservationists intervened to hand rear chicks. As few as 100 breeding pairs remain in the wild, rearing just 60 young between them each year on average. The 16 additional hand-reared young are a significant boost for the species, which is […]

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  • 500 Children’s animation on saving Spoon-billed Sandpiper

    This project involved 500 children and helpers from 12 areas and 8 countries (Russia, Republic of Korea, Japan, Jiangsu and Fujian in mainland China, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and Bangladesh) which are along Spoon-billed Sandpiper’s migratory route. Children helped colouring over 1200 pictures for the animation one by one. The whole project took about 8 months […]

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  • Slipping Away: Baer’s Pochard on the verge of extinction

    Baer’s Pochard Aythya baeri was formerly a relatively common and widespread duck in Asia, although it has possibly not been abundant for a long time, and in fact there has never really been a good understanding of its population size. This species has always been somewhat overlooked by ornithologists, partly owing to difficulties visiting and […]

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