• EAAFP Foundation protects Sura Tidal Flat with Film Special Screening

    On April 15, a special screening of the film <Sura> organized by EAAFP…


    Continue reading
  • A brief summary of Bird Ringing in Mongolia in 2021-2022

      Pacific Golden Plover © Batmunkh Davaasuren Bird ringing is a crucial method for monitoring bird populations and raising public awareness about conservation efforts. Mongolia is located on three major flyways (East Asian-Australasian Flyway, Central Asian Flyway, and West Pacific Flyway) for migratory birds, and the Wildlife Science and Conservation Center (WSCC) aims to study and monitor bird populations using all three flyways through the use of bird ringing stations. In 2015, WSCC initiated migratory bird ringing activities at Khurkh Bird Ringing Station (Khurkh BRS), which was the first stationary bird ringing effort in Mongolia. Since then, the number of Mongolian bird ringing stations has gradually increased to five. In this report, we present the findings from three bird ringing stations located across the country, namely Khurkh, Khovd and Ugii Bird Ringing Stations,  each with slightly different coverage goals. Other than bird ringing, research activities at the stations included Local breeding bird survey, raptor banding, Shorebird leg-flagging, Yellow-breasted Bunting project, and studies on ticks on migratory birds. In addition, there are other capacity-building and CEPA activities, such as International bird banding training, student practice, celebration of World Migratory Bird Day and other outreach activities. Please refer to the full report, available here. For inquiries, please contact Batmunkh Davaasuren at batmunkh@wscc.org.mn  


    Continue reading
  • Seminar and Training on Shorebird Banding for Bird Conservationists at Trisik Beach, Kulon Progo, Special Region of Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    2022 EAAFP Small Grant Fund Project by Ahmad Zulfikar Abdullah Endemic Indonesia Society Mist net installation practice © Endemic Indonesia Society Birdbanding is a technique used to study wild birds which had been applied internationally in numerous researches and requires a distinct set of skills and expertise, including equipment use, bird safety, and alertness during the entire process. Bird banding has been a regular activity in Indonesia since the 1950s, and is supervised by the Indonesian Bird Banding Scheme (IBBS). Since 2010, bird banding groups have emerged from different cities including Bogor, Yogyakarta, and Surabaya. However, the majority of these groups have failed to maintain a consistent program for the past few years, which resulted in the absence of new bird banding activists. This is shown by the stagnant number of licensed bird bander in Indonesia. With support from the EAAFP Small Grant Fund for Working Groups and Task Forces, Endemic Indonesia Society organized a bird banding-focused event through seminars and training. This event, which was held on November 19-23, 2022, has been conducted in Yogyakarta due to its ease of access and could involve the active bird banding community, Jogja Birdbanding Club. We believe that reintroducing bird banding through seminars and hands-on workshops to bird conservation activists, especially the younger age group, is urgently needed to ensure the continuity of bird banding scheme in Indonesia as well as keeping information on bird migration updated.   Seminar The first plan for the seminar, which was held offline, was changed to online in order to reach more participants. This seminar has presented speakers from ornithology experts, especially those related to bird banding and wetlands. Participants who attended the event came from various backgrounds such as bird researchers, bird watchers, university students, local NGOs, government staff especially in the environment sector, and the local community.   Presented seminar topics including : National and Global Perspective of Bird Banding Speaker: Prof. Dr. Dewi Malia Prawiradilaga, MSc., PhD. (National Research and Innovation Agency; Indonesian Bird Banding Scheme) Bird Banding Techniques & Application in Research Speaker: Ign. Pramana Yuda, Ph.D. (Lecture of Atma Jaya Yogyakarta University; President of Indonesian Ornithologists Union) Wetlands and Migratory Bird Conservation Speaker : Ragil Satriyo Gumilang, S.Hut., M.Si. (Wetlands International Indonesia) Goverment’s Role in Migratory Bird Conservation in Trisik Beach Speaker: Tri Dibyo Sumbogo (Natural Resources Conservation Agency of Yogyakarta) First Speaker Second Speaker Third Speaker Fourth Speaker The seminar that was held one day before the training went successfully. Discussions during the seminar showed that the topics presented by the speakers were well understood by the participants. From this seminar, it can be concluded that wetland conservation is generally known by the public, but it's the exact opposite in bird banding. It needs to be collaborative activities that involve many stakeholders if we want to apply this method to support bird and habitat conservation programs.   Training The training was attended by 20 participants who had registered and been selected. This activity was assisted by trainers and assistants who have bird banding licenses issued by the Indonesian Bird Banding Scheme. The main trainer was Iwan Febrianto from the Yayasan Ekologi Satwa Liar Indonesia. Participants came from various backgrounds such as students, lecturers, NGO activists, bird watchers, and veterinarians. These activities were divided into two stages. The first stage was conducted twice, in July and September, with passerine birds as the target. This stage aimed to introduce and familiarise the participants with bird banding techniques. Some of the birds that were successfully tagged including: Actitis hypoleucos, Alophoixus bres, Arachnothera longirostra, Cinnyris ornatus, Halcyon cyanoventris, Lonchura leucogastroides, Orthotomus sutorius, Passer montanus, Pellorneum capistratum.   Bird banding in July Introduce mist net installation Bird tagging Halcyon cyanoventris Bird banding in September Bird measurements Actitis hypoleucos   Orthotomus sutorius   The second stage, training with shorebird targets, was conducted in November in Trisik beach area and Progo River estuary. Both locations become an ideal location for our training program due to its easy access and long history of shorebird records. Briefing for participants Mist net installation practice Mist net installation practice   Mist net installation practice During the four days of training, it was raining almost every evening and night with strong winds. This condition causes the installation of nets to become not optimal considering that shorebird banding is ideally carried out at night. The training was maximized in the morning and afternoon by targeting birds in the location, which were mostly passerine birds. Some of the birds that were successfully tagged including: Alcedo coerulescens, Anthreptes malacensis, Cisticola juncidis, Geopelia striata, Lonchura leucogastroides, Lonchura punctulata, Orthotomus sutorius, Passer montanus, Prinia inornata, Turnix suscitator. Calidris alba Calidris melanotos Phalaropus fulicaria Philomachus pugnax The conclusion from these events is that there are needs to be encouragement in the form of continuous activities to optimize the use of this method, in order to support bird and habitat conservation efforts.   The project was funded through the 2022 EAAFP WG/TF Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here.


    Continue reading
  • Strengthening And Raising Awareness On Migratory Birds Trading Or Hunting Through Building The Capacity To Relevant Stakeholders In Cambodia

    2020 EAAFP Small Grant Fund Project by Phallis Eang General Directorate of Natural Protected Area, Ministry of Environment, Cambodia   Cambodia is located along the EAAFP and has become Partner of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) since 2007. Cambodia wetlands provide essential habitats or the stopover site for many migratory birds including Great Knot, Nordmann’s greenshank, Asian Dowitcher, Black-tailed Godwit, Eurasian Curlew, Sandplover spp., Chinese Egret, Bar-tailed Godwit, Yellow-breasted Bunting, etc. as well as short distance migratory bird like Sarus Crane. To date, there are five wetlands which had been designated as Ramsar Sites and one designated as EAAFP Flyway Network Site. Cambodia is rich in biodiversity and more than 600 bird species were recorded including land and waterbirds. However, there is little known about migratory bird hunting and trading. The relevant legislations related to illegal hunting are in place, but the dissemination on the illegal hunting of migratory waterbirds is limited. Under EAAFP small grant project, an online workshop on bird identification and relevant regulation on illegal trading of wild birds were organized by the General Directorate of Administration for Nature Conservation and Protection, Ministry of Environment Cambodia in order to provide the capacity building to relevant authorities as well as raising the awareness to public. The overall objective of the workshop is to provide capacity building to site managers and rangers on the bird identification and relevant regulation on illegal trading of wild birds as well as share that knowledge to relevant people in their working stations. The workshop was precise over by H.E. Kim Nong, Director General of General Directorate of Natural Protected Area, with 90 participations from 7 departments under General Directorate of Natural Protected Area, Department of Environmental Knowledge, Department of Community Livelihood, Department of Biodiversity, Department of Environmental Information and Dissemination, Department of Ecotourism, 12 Provincial Department of Environment such as Takeo Province, Kampot Province, Kep Province, Koh Kong Province, Battambang Province, Kampong Thom Province, Siem Reap Province, Stueng Treng Province, Kampong Cham Province, Tboung Khmom Province, Banteay Meanchey Province and Prey Veng Province, relevant NGOs including BirdLife International, NataureLife Cambodia, WWT, WCS, WWF, WA, WEA, as well as acadmics from the Pannasastra University of Cambodia and the Royal University of Agriculture. Three training presentations were delivered by the trainers. The first presentation was delivered by Mr. Hong Chamnan on the basic of waterbirds identification. The next presentation was provided by Dr. Ding Li Yong from BirdLife International Asia and his presentation focused on the results of illegal bird hunting situation in Southeast Asia. The last presenter was Mr. Sou Sontara who present on the relevant laws and regulations related to illegal bird hunting in Protected Areas. A number of awareness-raising materials focused on illegal trading and hunting of migratory birds were produced. Those included the video and posters which were developed and designed by youths. The posters were provided to relevant institutions especially to the Provincial Department of Environment and wetland site managers for awareness-raising purposes while the video was public in the social media platform reaching more than thousand public. Through the training workshop, relevant departments, provincial department of environments, wetland site managers, rangers, academics and other participants who attended this workshop gained  knowledge and understanding of the waterbird identification and relevant regulation on illegal trading of wild birds. They would share the knowledge with their colleagues and relevant people who work in the same field. Moreover, through the dissemination of posters and awareness videos, the public awareness of the disadvantages of illegal trading and hunting of migratory birds and also the negative impact of wild bird consumption on their health. The results from this project will contribute to the effort of reducing illegal trading and hunting of migratory birds. In addition, the trainees who are working on the ground will continue to share the knowledge and information from the workshop with their community. It is recommended to conduct more training and dissemination workshops on law and regulation related to illegal hunting, trading and consumption of wild birds and involved more relevant people especially the site manager and rangers who work on the ground. It is one of the effective mechanisms to sustainably protect and conserve the migratory waterbirds for illegal hunting and trading. It is also recommended to organize a series of education and awareness-raising activities or campaigns at the ground level and to the local communities. In addition, more research studies on the hunting and trading of migratory waterbird species should be conducted to provide data and information for supporting the decision-making and policy development. Web link: https://www.moe.gov.kh/index/32753 Facebook Post: https://www.facebook.com/314699302002531/posts/2096349793837464/ Video: https://fb.watch/j5qQMKaG1v/ Awareness-raising posters were designed and disseminated to local stakeholders © Ministry of Environment, Cambodia   H.E. Kim Nong, Director General of General Directorate of Natural Protected Area, provided opening speech during the workshop on bird identification and relevant regulation on illegal trading of wild birds © Ministry of Environment, Cambodia Trainers and Guest speakers delivered the presentation lecture to participants during the training workshop © Ministry of Environment, Cambodia Participants to the online workshop on bird identification and relevant regulation on illegal trading of wild birds © Ministry of Environment, Cambodia The project was funded through the 2020 EAAFP WG/TF Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here.


    Continue reading
  • Revealing migration of an unknown EAAF waterbird: The Wood Snipe

    EAAFP Small Grant Fund Project by Xiaotong Ren, Peking University Shen Zhang, Shanshui Conservation Center On the remote alpine meadows of Pingwu County, Mianyang, Sichuan, China, there is a mysterious bird species that even locals rarely have a chance to see. Some of the villagers who often go to the alpine meadow said: “The call and flight of 'mud driller' (the name for Wood Snipe by local people, because it usually feeds on the ground) could be heard nearby when we stayed in huts at night. Sometimes, the sound of its flight is very strange, like there are little bells on its body, and it ‘po-po-po’ falls to the ground.” This is the Wood Snipe (Gallinago nemoricola, Figure 1). Snipes (Gallinago spp.) are a very special group of shorebirds: unlike most "typical" shorebirds that prefer to live on muddy or sandy riverbanks and beaches, snipes tend to live in concealed wetland vegetation. The Wood Snipe is an even more distinctive species among snipes. According to historical specimen collections and birdwatching records, they appear in tropical forests near South Asia and Southeast Asia in winter but breeds in alpine meadows of the Himalayas and Hengduan Mountains in summer. Figure 1. Wood Snipe at Pingwu County ©Tong Mu The mystery of Wood Snipes is largely due to the difficulty in reaching alpine meadows, combined with their secretive behavior. Basic information about the species, such as population size, complete distribution range, habitat preferences, diet, and behavior, is extremely scarce. Prior to our project, the only modern research conducted on this species was a population survey project in Nepal. Current knowledge of the species is mostly based on piecing together various historical records and sporadic birdwatching records. While we know almost nothing about basic aspects of Wood Snipes, they have already been listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List, with a declining population estimated at only 2,500-9,999 individuals globally. As the Chinese proverb goes, "the beginning is always the hardest," our fieldwork started in the midst of great unknowns. Based on historical records, interviews with local residents, and valuable information from Mr. Wang of the Mianyang Birdwatching Society, we speculated that the Wood Snipes would appear in early May at their breeding ground in Pingwu County. Our advance team gathered to conduct a final recce in late April 2021 before the formal field work started. However, to everyone's surprise, the Wood Snipes had arrived before us, even though it was still snowing heavily on the mountain (Figure 2). Just as the locals had said, we didn't spot any of them until nightfall when we heard their flying and singing near our shelters. The first batch of team members quickly assembled and departed on April 30th, only several days after the recce, rushing into the formal field work stage. Figure 2: Heavy snow suddenly falls when we were searching for Wood Snipes. The snowy weather at our study area could last until the beginning of June From May 1st, we started our 2-month fieldwork on alpine meadow living at a simple and crude camp (3400m in elevation, Figure 3) without electricity and stable mobile phone signal but surrounded by Wood Snipe display every sunrise and sunset. Our objective was to investigate the population size and distribution of Wood Snipes and characterize the habitats and threats to Wood Snipes at our study area and to identify the migratory route and wintering grounds of the Wood Snipe population that breeds in the Hengduan Mountains. We conducted population size and distribution survey, preliminary observation and description of breeding biology, call survey, individual capture and banding, survey for habitat characteristics and food resource. Figure 3: Camp site in the field We recorded a total of 123 Wood Snipe occurrence sites during the field survey in 2021. We estimated there were 9 home ranges in the entire study area, each representing 1 - 2 adult individuals. We also found that across the entire alpine meadow which seemed identical to us ranging from about 3400 - 3750 m, Wood Snipes preferred lower elevation (<3600m) and median level of soil moisture. They also had a higher probability of occurrence at sites with more potential food resources (soil macroinvertebrates). We also captured and banded 7 individual Wood Snipes and successfully fitted tracking devices to them while ensuring that the weight of each tracking device was less than 5% of the corresponding individual's body weight (Figure 4). Since the tracking devices were unstable, we only had the southward migration routes for two individuals and northward migration route for one individual (Figure 5). This was the first time that the migration of this cryptic species had been revealed. Figure 4: Wood Snipe individual fitted with satellite transmitter Figure 5: Map of Wood Snipe tracking in non-breeding season. Individuals marked by colors: orange indicates south-ward migration of one individual, dark blue and light blue indicate south-ward and north-ward migration of another individual respectively Our work for Wood Snipe in 2021 is just the beginning for the study and conservation of this species and much remains to be done in the future. You could find more details in our report and future publications. Please contact us if you are interested in our project or have any questions about it. The project was funded through the 2021 EAAFP WG/TF Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here.  


    Continue reading
  • Global population of Black-faced Spoonbill continues to break new record

    © Jay Kong/HKBWS Coordinated by EAAFP Partner, The Hong Kong Bird Watching Society (HKBWS), the International Black-faced Spoonbill Census 2023 was conducted from 6th to 8th January 2023. Global population of Black-faced Spoonbills (BFSs) reaches another record high of 6,603, a rise of 7.2% (i.e. 441 individuals) from last year. However, 299 individuals were recorded in the Deep Bay area across Hong Kong and Shenzhen, which is 70 individuals less compared to last year. The number shows a decline of 11% and 19% from 2021 and 2022 respectively. Steady growth in Taiwan, Mainland China and Korea while moderate decline in Japan and almost 20% drop in Deep Bay The census covered about 130 sites all over the world. Taiwan, Mainland China and the Republic of Korea are the major regions which attribute to the growth in the overall population. Taiwan remains the largest congregation site with 4,228 individuals comprising 64% of the global population. The year-on-year growth is 10.6%. In Mainland China, 1,307 individuals and 15.1% year-on-year growth were recorded. The number comprised 20% of the global population. In Ro Korea, the number of BFS reaches 54 individuals with an increase of 45.9%, i.e. 17 individuals. Contrarily, in Japan 610 individuals are recorded which shows a decline of 10.7% from last year, i.e. 73 individuals less. The results this year shows that the global population of Black-faced Spoonbills has increased steadily. The numbers in Taiwan and Mainland China have been setting new records in recent years, which suggests the conditions in those habitats are favourable for a larger number of Black-faced Spoonbills to stay or to gather. Favourable conditions may refer to a safe environment, and sufficient food sources in nearby feeding grounds. The decline in Japan might be related to the loss of stopover sites and the outbreak of bird flu, according to local experts. In Deep Bay area, 299 individuals were recorded, which is the second lowest record in the last decade. Compared to last year, there were 70 individuals les, that is 19% decline. Having reached its record high of 462 individual in 2010, the number of BFS in Deep Bay has not advanced since then and remained above 300 from 2016 until it dropped to 299 this year. The result this year is worrying. Fig. 1 Black-faced Spoonbill Census results 1989-2023 © HKBWS Fig. 2 Black-faced Spoonbill Population size and distribution © HKBWS Fig. 3 Black-faced Spoonbill Census results regional breakdown 1989-2023 © HKBWS   The problem of habitat degradation must be confronted, and conservation should be prioritized in the Northern Metropolis Development Strategy The decline in the number of Black-faced spoonbills in Deep Bay area is alarming to Hong Kong. Black-faced Spoonbills mainly forage in the intertidal mudflats of Deep Bay, shallow waters in Gei Wai, and drained fishponds. As the Ramsar Wetland in Mai Po Inner Deep Bay is relatively adequately protected by law, these habitats can be maintained in relatively good conditions. However, the habitats outside the nature reserve are facing different threats. Without immediate measures, they may become unsuitable for Black-faced Spoonbills to loaf and feed. For instance, the expansion of mangroves, including the invasive species Sonneratia caseolaris, continues to eat up the mudflats resulting in a reduction in the habitat available to Black-faced Spoonbills. On the other hand, nearly 30% of the fishpond wetlands and the buffer zones in Deep Bay are hoarded by real estate developers or held privately. These lands have been abandoned or the land use has been altered, which continuously causes habitat degradation in the Deep Bay area. If proactive conservation and management actions are not taken immediately, there is a risk for losing these important winter habitats of the Black-faced Spoonbills’. In order to protect the Black-faced Spoonbill, many countries and cities put great effort into different conservation actions in the past 30 years, and finally the decline of the species is successfully reversed. "It is especially important to establish comprehensive protection laws, long-term conservation strategies and good land use planning, which can restore endangered species and even biodiversity around the world." Mr. Yu Yat-tung, Director of The Hong Kong Bird Watching Society, continued, "The future of the Deep Bay wetlands is determined by the conservation and planning of the Northern Metropolis Development Strategy. To protect the ecological integrity of this internationally important wetland, the Northern Metropolis must comply with the guidelines to protect "Wetland Conservation Area" and "Wetland Buffer Area". The wetland conservation park system must fully cover the "Inner Deep Bay and Shenzhen River catchment area" Important Bird Area recognized by BirdLife International, and ensure them to be protected by stricter laws and regulations; also a management model that is people and ecology oriented must be applied.” Hong Kong is responsible for the proper protection of wetlands and biodiversity, the maintenance of the important ecological corridors for migratory birds, and the assistance to China in fulfilling its obligations under the “Convention on Biological Diversity” and the “Convention on Wetlands”. The Hong Kong Bird Watching Society hopes that the Northern Metropolis can practice "ecological priority", through proper management and conservation of the Deep Bay wetlands, turn crisis into opportunity, and maximize the benefits of bird conservation.   Fig. 4 Trend of Black-faced Spoonbill population in Deep Bay © HKBWS   About The International Black-faced Spoonbill Census Black-faced Spoonbill is listed as "Endangered" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. The International Black-faced Spoonbill Census takes place every January ever since it was first launched in 1994. During Census 2023, more than 200 veteran birdwatchers, conservationists, researchers and ornithologists were mobilized to record the number of wintering Black-faced Spoonbills at about 130 sites. Reposting of news article from Hong Kong Bird Watching Society with permission, original article (link). Learn about EAAFP Black-faced Spoonbill Working Group: https://www.eaaflyway.net/black-faced-spoonbill-working-group/  


    Continue reading
  • Post-hatch survival and migratory movements of juvenile Bar-tailed Godwits in Alaska

    2022 EAAFP Small Grant Fund Project by Jesse R. Conklin Independent Researcher Satellite-transmitter deployed on Bar-tailed Godwit chick. ©Jesse Conklin   Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica are globally Near Threatened, and on the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, the subspecies L. l. baueri qualifies for Vulnerable status based on observed population declines and loss of staging habitat. This subspecies breeds cryptically and at low densities in remote regions of Alaska, and consequently there is little breeding-related demographic information, and essentially nothing is known about fledging success or post-fledging survival rates within Alaska or on the first southward migration. Alaska-breeding Bar-tailed Godwits have received global attention for their impressive annual migration of >30,000 km, which includes a direct trans-Pacific flight of 11,000–13,000 km from post-breeding staging grounds to non-breeding sites in New Zealand and eastern Australia, the longest non-stop flight recorded for any landbird. However, we have no information about how juvenile godwits manage this southbound journey, which is performed when they are just 3–4 months old and may represent a critical demographic bottleneck for the population. This pilot study was designed to achieve two complementary goals: (1) to gather the first data on the movements, growth, and survival of Bar-tailed Godwit chicks at the breeding grounds in Alaska, and (2) to assess the feasibility of tracking juvenile Bar-tailed Godwits on their first southbound migration by deploying satellite-transmitters on nearly-fledged birds at the breeding grounds. In collaboration with colleagues from the U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Migratory Bird Division, and Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Germany, I conducted this work in June–July 2022 near Nome, Alaska, a known breeding area for Bar-tailed Godwits. The plan was to: (1) locate young broods in or near nesting areas, (2) capture adults and chicks to deploy radio-transmitters, (3) track brood movements and recapture chicks periodically to monitor growth, and (4) deploy satellite-transmitters once chicks had grown to a sufficient size to carry them, to follow movements away from the breeding area. Apparently low local breeding success in 2022 meant that few Bar-tailed Godwit broods were available for study. However, we found seven broods and radio-tagged 1–3 chicks in five of these broods; no adults were captured and tagged. Following these broods, we collected the very first chick growth, movement, and diet data for the subspecies. Broods moved surprisingly large distances: chicks just 2–3 days old moved 200–500 m per day, and older chicks (>20 d old) moved at least 1–3 km per day, including climbing from low, wet valleys to open habitats along ridges. We followed one brood long enough to deploy 5-g solar-powered satellite-transmitters on three chicks estimated 26 days old, on 15 July. We successfully tracked one of these chicks (individual flagged ‘B6’) to the non-breeding range: this bird flew from the study area to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta on 6 August, where it staged until departing on 13 October, and then flew non-stop to Tasmania, an estimated flight distance of 13,436 km in 11 days. This was the longest non-stop distance recorded for any landbird species, surpassing all previous adult migrations tracked for this species (up to ca. 13,000 km). Despite a lower-than-expected sample of godwit chicks, we consider this pilot study a successful proof of principle and methods for further research. In particular, we showed that tracking Bar-tailed Godwits on their first southward migration is feasible from the breeding grounds, and that first-time migrants are capable of making the trans-Pacific journey non-stop, as adults do. We expect study areas with higher godwit breeding density and lower topographic and vegetation diversity, such as the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, will be more profitable for future efforts to study chick growth, movement, and survival, and we will aim to follow up these preliminary efforts in the coming years.   Bar-tailed Godwit chick captured at ~20 days old ©. Photo: Dan Ruthrauff Radio-tracking Bar-tailed Godwit chicks. Photo : © Dan Ruthrauff Wing development of godwit B6 at 26 days old. ©Photo: Jesse Conklin Southbound migration track of B6 from Alaska to Tasmania. ©Image: Max Planck Institute of Ornithology, Germany   The project was funded through the 2022 EAAFP WG/TF Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here.  


    Continue reading
  • Young Shorebird Ambassador Course” at Pak Thale-Laem Phak Bia Flyway Network Site, Thailand 2021-2022

    EAAFP Small Grant Fund project by Bird Conservation Society Thailand Fig. 1. Poster to promote the youth camp © Bird Conservation Society Thailand   Pak Thale-Laem Phak Bia is one of the three Flyway Network Sites (FNS) in Thailand. It is located on the coast of Phetchaburi in the Inner Gulf of Thailand. The site is internationally recognized as an important location of migratory shorebirds, most notably the globally Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper, along with other globally threatened birds such as Great Knot, Spotted Greenshank, Far Eastern Curlew and Chinese Egret, which make Pak Thale-Laem Phak Bia their winter home. The site is mainly covered by salt pans, which are important roosting and feeding habitats during the high tide, when the neighbouring mud flats are covered. Salt production is also one of the main sources of income for the local communities. BCST has worked exclusively at Pak Thale-Laem Phak Bia FNS for more than 10 years. We realize the importance of preserving the saltpan landscape, both for the migratory shorebirds and for the livelihood of local communities. In 2019, BCST made a strategic land purchase, with the help of the Rainforest Trust and public crowdfunding, of 8 ha of salt pans at Pak Thale and established as “Pak Thale Nature Reserve”. The main activities at the reserve include managing habitat for shorebirds, regular shorebird monitoring, as well as awareness raising and capacity building activities for the local youth and salt farmers. Through this project, BCST would like to raise awareness among young people throughout Thailand by supporting a group of students who are passionate about producing media to learn about shorebirds and gain first-hand experience in studying the shorebirds and other related elements. This group of students will produce a set of multimedia projects which promotes the importance of shorebirds and shorebird conservation as the result of this project. To support and empower young people to communicate capacity from both urban and local groups to enhance public awareness on the importance of shorebird conservation outcomes. We developed a programme called “Young Shorebird Ambassador” to promote and to recruit young people from places in Thailand. BCST opened for applications from youth (between 15-23 years old) from all over Thailand to apply for the course as an individual or as a team (up to 3 persons) in September - October 2021. Applicants were required to write a short essay explaining how he/she thinks becoming a “Young Shorebird Ambassador” could benefit the conservation of shorebirds and propose a concept of a media project that he/she wants to produce to raise awareness of shorebird conservation. There were 3 themes of products by the ambassadors: short VDO, photography and journals and reviewed by professionals in media. Finally, BCST selected up to 10 applicants by short essays and interview to join the “Young Shorebird Ambassador Course” to be conducted both in Bangkok and Pak Thale Nature Reserve in November and December 2021. BCST held the first 2 day-workshopthrough online training due to COVID restriction, to introduce all selected applicants to the course . The main topics in the first workshop included: introduction to migratory shorebirds, Connections between shorebirds and human, Nature games to familiarize applicants to bird ecology, and basic shorebird identification. The applicants are required to develop and present their topics, concept and the types of media that they would like to produce by end of November to our mentors. The second 4 day-workshop was held at Pak Thale Nature Reserve with a stop at Khok Kham Nature Conservation Club, where BCST has a strong connection with a local conservation group that has been involved in the conservation of Spoon-billed Sandpiper for many decades. The applicants have learned through field visits and field activities at the actual site about shorebirds and the connections between shorebirds and local livelihood, particularly salt farming. During this workshop, the applicants were required to collect as many materials as needed to produce their media projects. The final project and production submission was in January-February 2022, the applicants submitted their media projects for BCST to comment on and evaluate. The final media projects of all applicants were shown at the Thailand Bird Fair 2023, an annual event by BCST to be held in late November, followed by BCST social media (Facebook, Twitter, website). This is one of VDO and photo production by our participant, Peera   © Bird Conservation Society Thailand   Fig.2. Photo exhibition banner and open ceremony on 5 Jul- 9 Sep 2022 © Bird Conservation Society Thailand   © Bird Conservation Society Thailand Fig. 3 Journals with photos by young shorebird ambassador © Bird Conservation Society Thailand Fig. 4 during the mentoring session © Bird Conservation Society Thailand   The project was funded through the 2021 EAAFP WG/TF Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here.  


    Continue reading
  • Farewell to Yunjeong Choi, Programme Assistant

    In the words of Yunjeong Choi, 3rd Incheon-Hong Kong International East Asian-Australasian Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation Cooperation Forum © EAAFP Secretariat   "Learning various languages requires an understanding of the cultural background of the language. As I major in French from high school and get to know classmates majoring in other languages, my strong interest in working in different regions and with colleagues from diverse cultural backgrounds grew. And as I double majored in Public Administration in university, I also wanted to practice my knowledge of governmental organizations and expected to gain insights into various types of organizations. My personal interest in zero waste movement and animal rights also made me apply for the job at EAAFP. When I started my internship here, I expected to improve my language and communication skills as well as my working abilities. After 6 long months as Programme Assistant, I would like to say I had an opportunity to widen and deepen my knowledge of how international organizations work, as well as to continue my willingness to environmentalism and animal rights. This internship truly was a great opportunity to train myself and learn what I wanted to contribute to the greater good of humankind. During the 6 months internship period in the EAAFP, I mainly worked in support of various events in which the Secretariat participated and coordinated international forums as well as programs. Even though I experienced coordination of events before, the scale of the event and amazing enthusiasm from the staff made me learn a lot about the overall operation of the projects.   Suncheon Bay © Yunjeong Choi   One of the most important things I have learned from the internship is understanding. At a glance, some of my works do not seem consecutive and coherent. It rather seems like a series of separate things from separate categories. However, as you continue to do the tasks, you will be able to figure out the overall process and understand how the overall process proceeds. Repeating this procedure for 6 months really helped me to interpret how certain things take place in the procedure, and what my duties are. As the Programme Team works jointly with other teams a lot, I was able to work with almost all the members of the Secretariat and got help from everyone. During the process, I learned how to communicate with different people and how to manage the work in each other’s ways. This method really helped me learn various ways to deal with work I have never done and improved my communication skills. With my understanding and knowledge of my tasks and the overall operation, I became able to understand the mechanism of international organizations and how they operate. All the staff here are very confident about their projects and what they made. Their dedication and enthusiasm towards migratory waterbirds conservation really touched me and made me continue my efforts for nature conservation. All the efforts of the EAAFP Secretariat staff would truly bring a difference to humankind and their perceptions and further to the earth. The 6 months I spent here improved me to be a better worker as well as a better person. "    


    Continue reading
  • Watch the award-winning movie to help conserve wetlands!

    EAAFP Foundation is pleased to invite you to the special screening of <Sura: A love Song > at CGV Incheon Yeonsu on 15 April at 10:30 am. <Sura> is a documentary about the Sura Tidal Flat, which is the last remaining tidal flat in the Saemangeum reclamation area in Ro Korea. Over the period of 30 years, area of tidal flats same as the size of two-thirds of Seoul, have been destroyed to make new dry land in Saemanguem, many migratory waterbirds, including Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper, disappeared from the site Sura Tidal Flat could be reclaimed at any time to build a new military airport, but globally endangered and protected species still call it home. The movie is telling the story of a citizen who loves the birds and devoted to protect the last piece of wetland Sura. In this special screening hosted by EAAFP Foundation and BFS Eco-Center, you will see the life of the migratory waterbirds and other organisms in the Sura Tidal Flat besieged by the constant threat of reclamation and the people who are fighting for the restoration of the tidal flat. The screening will then be followed by a dialogue with the film director and a youth monitoring member and an optional, first-come, first-served, Black-faced Spoonbill (IUCN status: Endangered) birdwatching program at Namdong Reservoir in Incheon. English subtitles and interpretation will be provided. *Pre-registration is required. Synopsis: In the tidal flats dried up by reclamation projects, Dong-pil, a citizen scientist, records the remaining birds in photographs. He cannot forget the enchanting group dance of shorebirds that he saw a long time ago. Filmmaker Yun hears Dong-pil’s story and feels his fascination conveyed to her. She resumes making a documentary, which she gave up on in the past. Date: 15 April, 2023 (Sat) 10:30 am Venue: CGV Incheon Yeonsu Hall 3 Organizers: EAAFP Foundation, <Sura> producers, BFS Eco-Center Registration: Scan the QR code or follow the link [https://forms.gle/gMtJpVAxUaeQxoFy5] Registration Deadline: 14 April 2023 Entry fee: KRW 24,000 (*Part of the fee will be donated for the conservation of migratory waterbirds and their habitats and for making the small gifts for the participants) Souvenirs for the participants     Program   Contact: EAAFP Foundation (foundation@eaaflyway.net | 032-458-6507) [Korean version] [관객이 만드는 특별시사회: 당신의 수라는 무엇입니까?]에 초대합니다 (인천연수 CGV, 4/15)  간척으로 말라버린 갯벌에서, 시민과학자 동필은 남아있는 새들을 사진으로 기록한다. 그는 오래전 보았던 도요새의 군무를 잊지 못하고 그리워한다. 영화감독 윤은 동필의 이야기를 듣고 매혹이 전이되는 것을 느낀다. 그녀는 과거에 포기했던 영화를 다시 만들기 시작한다.  인간과 동물의 공생을 모색하고 환경 생태 운동에 지속적인 관심을 두어온 황윤 감독이 운명처럼 ‘새만금의 도시’ 군산으로 이사를 갔다. 십수 년 전 새만금척사업으로 갯벌에 관한 영화를 찍다가 덮었던 그였다. <수라>는 20여년간 활동을 이어온 새만금시민생태조사단과 걸음을 같이하며 갯벌의 아름다움을 재발견하는 과정을 담았다. 여기에는 내셔널지오그래픽 영상을 능가하는 미려한 이미지들로 가득하다. 감독은 카메라 뒤가 아니라 프레임 안에서 그걸 지켜본다. 친밀하고 진솔한 1인칭 보이스오버를 따라 수라 갯벌의 작고 아름다운 생명체들을 보는 일은 분명 경이로운 경험이지만, 영화는 남아있는 것들에서 어떤 시급함, 절박함도 보길 요청한다. 마지막 씬의 장관, ‘도요새의 군무’가 잊기 힘든 이유이기도 하다.  출처: 네이버 영화 줄거리  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  재단법인 EAAFP, 영화<수라> 제작진, 저어새 생태학습관이 함께 주최하는 <수라> 특별시사회가 4월 15일 인천연수 CGV에서 열린다.  시사회는 영화관람 후 관객과의 대화와 별도의 사전신청이 필요한 저어새 탐조 프로그램으로 진행될 예정이다. 영문자막과 통역이 제공되므로 누구나 참여 및 연사들과 소통할 수 있다.  <수라> 특별시사회는 사전신청자에 한해 참여가능하다. 사전신청을 마친 신청자에게 신청 확정 이메일이 발송되며, 4월 14일까지 신청 가능하다.  일시: 2023년 4월 15일(토) 오전 10:30  주최: 영화<수라>제작진, 재단법인EAAFP, 저어새생태학습관  장소: 인천연수CGV 3관  참가비: 24,000원/ 만18세미만 18,000원 (*참가비 일부는 기념품 증정 및 이동성 물새와 서식지 보전을 위해 재단법인EAAFP에 기부됩니다./ 참가비 전액 기부금 영수증 발행)  등록: QR코드 스캔 또는 아래 신청하기 버튼 클릭 후 구글 폼 제출(~4/14)  프로그램: 영화관람, 관객과의 대화, 조류생태환경프로그램 (영문자막 및 통역 제공)  문의: 재단법인EAAFP (foundation@eaaflyway.net | 032) 458-6507)  재단법인EAAFP 정기기부자들께는 좌석 우선선택권과 조류생태환경프로그램 등록 우선권의 혜택이 주어집니다.    신청하기  영문포스터 보기  예고편 보기  감독인사말 보기 


    Continue reading